Download the Fatigue at Work Employer Toolkit

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Photo: FS-Stock/iStockphoto

Fatigue is having an impact on your workforce and your bottom line. Research shows that nearly 13% of workplace injuries may be linked to fatigue, and more than 40% of U.S. workers are sleep deprived.

The Fatigue at Work Employer Toolkit from the National Safety Council aims to help employers address this safety risk in the workplace. The toolkit has materials for human resources personnel, supervisors and employees, including:

  • Posters and tip sheets
  • Digital presentations
  • 5-minute safety talks
  • White papers and reports
  • Sample policies to implement at your workplace

Download the toolkit today.

Older workers’ health: Finding the right job fit matters, researchers say

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Photo: Stígur Már Karlsson/Heimsmyndir/iStockphoto

Houston — For older workers, the right job fit can benefit overall health and well-being, while a poor fit is more likely to push them into retirement, according to researchers from Rice University and Colorado State University.  Read more»

OIG finds no evidence that MSHA fines act as deterrents

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Photo: EtiAmmos/iStockphoto

Washington — A recent audit from the Department of Labor Office of Inspector General found no correlation between safe mining operations and paid civil monetary penalties issued by the Mine Safety and Health Administration.

The audit, released Aug. 16, analyzed public MSHA incident and violation data between 2000 and 2017. Findings show that although MSHA collected about 90% of the more than $1 billion in violation penalties issued over the 18-year period, “most fatal or permanent-injury accidents occurred at mines where operators paid almost all of their penalties assessed.” Further, the auditors report “the frequency of severe violation recurrence was very similar whether or not violation penalties were paid.” Read more»

FMCSA Hours of Service Proposed Rule

 

**Update: Public Comment Period Now Open Until Monday, October 21, 2019**

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) has published a notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM) on updates to hours of service (HOS) rules to increase safety and provide additional flexibility for commercial drivers.

The proposed rule on hours of service rule offers five key modifications to the existing HOS rules:

  • The Agency proposes a change the short-haul exception available to certain commercial drivers by lengthening the drivers’ maximum on‑duty period from 12 to 14 hours and extending the distance limit within which the driver may operate from 100 air miles to 150 air miles.
  • The Agency proposes to modify the adverse driving conditions exception by extending by 2 hours the maximum window during which driving is permitted.
  • The Agency proposes to increase flexibility for the 30-minute break rule by tying the break requirement to 8 hours of driving time without an interruption for at least 30 minutes, and allowing the break to be satisfied by a driver using on duty, not driving status, rather than off duty.
  • The Agency proposes to modify the sleeper-berth exception to allow drivers to split their required 10-hours off duty into two periods: an 8 and 2 split or a 7 and 3 split, either off duty or in the sleeper berth. Neither period would count against the driver’s 14‑hour driving window.
  • The Agency proposes to allow one off-duty break of at least 30 minutes, but not more than 3 hours, that would pause a truck driver’s 14-hour driving window, provided the driver takes 10 consecutive hours off-duty at the end of the work shift.

Make your voice heard — COMMENT TODAY HERE  

Learn More:

>News Statement Announcement

>Federal Register Rule Document

>HOS NPRM Handout

MSHA Fatality #17

On August 29, 2019, a 25 year-old section foreman with 6 years of mining experience was fatally injured while exiting the longwall face.  The victim was struck and covered by a portion of mine rib measuring 25 feet in length, 3 feet in depth, and 8 ½ feet in height.

Fatality accident scene on August 29, 2019
Best Practices:
  • Be aware of potential hazards when working or traveling near mine ribs.
  • Take additional safety precautions when geologic conditions, or an increase in mining height, could cause roof or rib hazards.
  • Train all miners to conduct thorough and more frequent examinations of the roof, face, and ribs when miners work or travel close to the longwall face.  Continuously monitor for changing conditions.
  • Install rib supports of proper length with surface area coverage, on cycle, and in a consistent pattern for the best protection against rib falls.
Additional Information:

This is the 17th MSHA fatality reported in calendar year 2019.  As of this date in 2018, there were 13 MSHA fatalities reported.  This is the second MSHA fatality classified as Fall of Face, Rib, Pillar or Highwall in 2019.  There was one MSHA fatality classified as Fall of Face, Rib, Pillar or Highwall during the same period in 2018.

Arizona Geological Survey’s (AZGS) annual impact on Arizona’s economy

A new economic impact report shows that the products and services of the Arizona Geological Survey (UA AZGS) contributed nearly $32 million to Arizona’s economy over the past year – a 34-fold return on the survey’s FY-2018 state allocation of $941,000.
In Spring 2019, AZGS contracted with the Univ. of Arizona’s Eller School of Management graduate program to assess the annual contribution of our geologic products and services to Arizona’s economy. The results are in!

For more details, click here for today’s Arizona Geology blog post.

U.S. Department of Labor Selects New Director For OSHA’s Construction Directorate

WASHINGTON, DC – The U.S. Department of Labor has selected Scott Ketcham as the new director of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration’s (OSHA’s) Directorate of Construction (DOC) in Washington, D.C. Ketcham had served as deputy director of DOC since February 2017.

Prior to coming to OSHA’s national office, Ketcham worked for 19 years as an OSHA acting deputy regional administrator, area director, assistant area director, and compliance officer and manager in offices in the Seattle, Dallas and Philadelphia regions. Before joining OSHA, he spent five years as a staff industrial hygienist with the U.S. Army Medical Activity at Bassett Army Hospital on Ft. Wainwright, Alaska. He retired from the U.S. Army after 24 years of active and reserve service.

Ketcham holds a master’s degree in Public Administration from the University of Alaska, a Bachelor’s of Science degree from Texas A&M University, and is a Certified Safety Professional. He has a strong background in the general industry, maritime and construction industries.

“Scott Ketcham is a dedicated public servant,” said Loren Sweatt, Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary for Occupational Safety and Health. “He has demonstrated strong leadership throughout his OSHA career, and I am confident he will continue to achieve the mission of assuring safe and healthful working conditions for construction workers in his new position.”

Under the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, employers are responsible for providing safe and healthful workplaces for their employees. OSHA’s role is to help ensure these conditions for America’s working men and women by setting and enforcing standards, and providing training, education and assistance. For more information, visit www.osha.gov.

The mission of the Department of Labor is to foster, promote, and develop the welfare of the wage earners, job seekers, and retirees of the United States; improve working conditions; advance opportunities for profitable employment; and assure work-related benefits and rights.