Creating workplaces where we all watch out for each other

Creating workplaces where we all watch out for each other

Mine Rescue Day is October 30

First published by MSHA
Showing MIne Rescue training a amn polling on a water hoise.
Photo property of MSHA

October 30th was set aside as Mine Rescue Day (MRD) in 2013 as a time to recognize the dedication and sacrifice of volunteers who risk their own lives to save other miners.

Throughout our nation’s history, members of the mining community have been called upon to rescue their fellow miners from emergency situations in coal and metal and nonmetal mines, whether trapped by fires, explosions, roof falls, flooding or harmful gases. Over time, these mine rescuers have become better trained and organized, and the equipment they use has become ever more sophisticated.

Today, over 250 mine rescue teams are certified and equipped to perform mine rescue operations in the United States. They train and compete in mine rescue contests organized across the United States, culminating in national championships for coal and for metal and nonmetal mines, so they are ready to answer the call that they hope never comes. When they are called, these rescuers do not hesitate. They undertake some of the most difficult and risky emergency response work in this country, sometimes traveling miles in dark underground mines filled with debris and poisonous and explosive gases in order to find missing miners or recover those who did not survive. For more information on mine rescue, visit our mine rescue training page.

On Mine Rescue Day, we salute these brave individuals who give their time and risk their lives in the service of others.


McCraren Compliance offers many opportunities in safety training to help circumvent accidents. Please take a moment to visit our calendar of classes to see what we can do to help your safety measures from training to consulting.

MSHA – Mine Fatality #29

First published by MSHA

MINE FATALITY – On October 19, 2021, a 58-year-old mechanic with 17 years of experience was fatally injured when the articulated haul truck bed collapsed on him while he performed maintenance on the truck.

Accident scene where a 58-year-old mechanic with 17 years of experience was fatally injured when the articulated haul truck bed collapsed on him while he performed maintenance on the truck.
Photo property of MSHA
Best Practices:
  • Securely block from motion machinery or equipment that has been raised, and properly use mechanical blocking devices.  Ensure that blocking material is competent, substantial, and adequate to support and stabilize the load.
  • Position yourself in a safe location and away from potential “red-zone” areas where you can be injured.  Observe and follow all warning labels and signs on equipment.
  • Never work under a load that is unsupported or inadequately supported, and never depend on hydraulics to support a load.
  • Outfit haul trucks with a dump box lock bar that mechanically blocks the bed from coming down.
  • Develop and follow safe work procedures.
  • Always consult and follow the manufacturer’s recommended safe work procedures for the maintenance task.
Additional Information:

This is the 29th fatality reported in 2021, and the 3rd classified as “Falling, Rolling or Sliding Rock/Material.”


McCraren Compliance offers many opportunities in safety training to help circumvent accidents. Please take a moment to visit our calendar of classes to see what we can do to help your safety measures from training to consulting.

New Mine Inspector

First published by Office of the Governor Doug Ducey

Governor Ducey Announces Paul Marsh As Arizona State Mine Inspector

Marsh Will Succeed Inspector Joe Hart, One Of The Longest-Serving Leaders In Governor Ducey’s Administration

PHOENIX — Governor Doug Ducey today announced the appointment of Paul Marsh to serve as Arizona State Mine Inspector upon Joe Hart’s retirement from Arizona state service.

“Paul Marsh has over 25 years of industry experience and will bring a wealth of knowledge to the position,” said Governor Ducey. “He is a proven leader with strong communication skills and a history of working with safety standards and regulations. I’m confident his experience has given him all the tools needed to fill Inspector Joe Hart’s big shoes. Joe has been a stalwart of state government, serving in the Arizona Legislature for a decade before his election as Mine Inspector in 2006. He’s played an important role in overseeing the safety and regulations of Arizona’s mines — and I thank him for his many years of service.”

Inspector Hart is a fourth generation Arizonan and lifelong resident of Kingman, where the mining of gold, silver, copper and turquoise goes back decades. In his four statewide elections, he has always been one of Arizona’s top vote getters. While in the Arizona House of Representatives, he served as speaker pro-tem and Chairman of several committees. Prior to serving in the Legislature, Hart spent 20 years at Duval Mining Company, where he worked as a safety inspector.

The position of State Mine Inspector dates back to the Arizona Constitution of 1912, the year Arizona became a state. Arizona is the only state that elects a Mine Inspector.

“I am excited for the opportunity to serve all Arizonans as the State Mine Inspector,” Marsh said. “Inspector Hart has been critical in protecting both the public and miners by providing top-notch safety training. I look forward to the opportunity to continue protecting both the public and the miners that call Arizona home.”

Marsh has served as the Ready Mix Operations Manager in the Phoenix Division for CalPortland Company since February 2018. He previously served as CalPortland’s Director of Safety for the Southwest Region from March 2011 to February 2018.

While serving as Director of Safety for the Southwest Region at CalPortland, Marsh was responsible for the health and safety at 25 locations within Arizona and Southern California. He maintained relationships with managers, supervisors and employees to ensure compliance with all company, local, state and federal safety and health regulations. Marsh also oversaw two safety managers ensuring compliance with Mine Safety and Health Administration, Occupational Health and Safety Administration and Department of Transportation standards for operation.

Marsh is active in both industry and community organizations, including previously serving as the chair of the Community Relations Committee and the Safety Committee at the Arizona Rock Products Association, and as a member of the U.S. Marine Corps Reserve from June 1990 to June 1997. In 2015, he was awarded both the Arizona State Mine Inspector’s Office Safety Professional of the Year Award and the Arizona Mining Associations Copper Pot Award. Marsh was born and raised in the Phoenix area. Aside from military service, he has always resided in the Phoenix area.


McCraren Compliance offers many opportunities in safety training to help circumvent accidents. Please take a moment to visit our calendar of classes to see what we can do to help your safety measures from training to consulting.

New federal requirements for CDL applicants coming in February

Applicants must be trained by a registered provider

Beginning Feb. 7, 2022, the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration(link is external) (FMCSA) will require new commercial driver license (CDL) applicants and those seeking to upgrade their CDL to receive training from a certified organization on the national registry of Entry-Level Driver Training (ELDT) providers(link is external).

ELDT training includes curriculum in three areas: theory, range and road. To process and issue a CDL, the Arizona Department of Transportation Motor Vehicle Division will need to validate that an applicant has completed these training requirements.

This requirement impacts drivers attempting to:

  • Obtain a Class A or Class B commercial driver’s license (CDL) for the first time.
  • Upgrade an existing Class B CDL to a Class A CDL.
  • Obtain a school bus (S), passenger (P), or hazardous materials (H) endorsement for the first time.

The ELDT regulations are not retroactive and do not apply to individuals holding a valid CDL or an S, P, or H endorsement issued prior to Feb. 7, 2022.

If an organization or business currently trains its drivers and is interested in becoming a certified training provider on the national registry, visit tpr.fmcas.dot.gov(link is external) to learn how to register as a provider.

For more information, visit azdot.gov/CDL.

ADOT MEMO


McCraren Compliance can help you understand and comply with FMCSA, USDOT and ADOT and ensure your drivers and your vehicles operate safely and efficiently.

Call us Today at 888-758-4757 or email us at info@mccrarencompliance.com to schedule your free FMCSA Compliance Assessment.

US Department of Labor initiates rulemaking to protect workers, outdoors and indoors, from heat hazards amid rising temperatures

First published by OSHA

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Photo: OSHA

Coincides with Biden-Harris administration interagency effort to protect workers, communities

Record-breaking heat in the U.S. in 2021 endangered millions of workers exposed to heat illness and injury in both indoor and outdoor work environments. Workers in outdoor and indoor work settings without adequate climate-controlled environments are at risk of hazardous heat exposure, and workers of color are exposed disproportionately to hazardous levels of heat in essential jobs across these work settings.

In concert with a Biden-Harris administration interagency effort and its commitment to workplace safety, climate resilience and environmental justice, the U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration is publishing an Advance Notice of Proposed Rulemaking for Heat Injury and Illness Prevention in Outdoor and Indoor Work Settings on Oct. 27, 2021. Currently, OSHA does not have a specific standard for hazardous heat conditions and this action begins the process to consider a heat-specific workplace rule.

“As we continue to see temperatures rise and records broken, our changing climate affects millions of America’s workers who are exposed to tough and potentially dangerous heat,” said U.S. Department of Labor Secretary Marty Walsh. “We know a disproportionate number of people of color perform this critical work and they, like all workers, deserve protections. We must act now to address the impacts of extreme heat and to prevent workers from suffering the agony of heat illness or death.”

The Advance Notice of Proposed Rulemaking will initiate a comment period to gather diverse perspectives and expertise on topics, such as heat-stress thresholds, heat-acclimatization planning and exposure monitoring.

“While heat illness is largely preventable and commonly underreported, thousands of workers are sickened each year by workplace heat exposure, and in some cases, heat exposure can be fatal,” said Acting Assistant Secretary of Labor for Occupational Safety and Health Jim Frederick. “The Advance Notice of Proposed Rulemaking for Heat Injury and Illness Prevention in Outdoor and Indoor Work Settings is an important part of our multi-pronged initiative to protect indoor and outdoor workers from hazardous heat.”

Heat is the leading cause of death among all weather-related workplace hazards. To help address this threat, OSHA implemented a nationwide enforcement initiative on heat-related hazards, is developing a National Emphasis Program on heat inspections and forming a National Advisory Committee on Occupational Safety and Health Heat Injury and Illness Prevention Work Group to provide a better understanding of challenges and identify, and share best practices to protect workers.

Read the Federal Register notice for submission instructions. Beginning Oct. 27, submit comments at www.regulations.gov, the Federal e-Rulemaking Portal and refer to Docket No. OSHA-2021-0009. All comments must be submitted by Dec. 27, 2021.

Read the President Biden’s statement on Mobilizing the Administration to Address Extreme Heat.


McCraren Compliance offers many opportunities in safety training to help circumvent accidents. Please take a moment to visit our calendar of classes to see what we can do to help your safety measures from training to consulting.

Create opportunities for worker engagement in safety

First published by Safety+Health an NSC publication
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A key principle of OSHA’s Safe + Sound campaign is “worker participation.” (The others: “find and fix hazards” and “management leadership.”) OSHA defines worker participation as “engaging workers at all levels in establishing, implementing, evaluating and improving safety and health in the workplace so that workers understand they are a valuable partner in making their workplace safer and are encouraged to communicate with management about hazards on the job.”

OSHA recommends employers ask for and listen to feedback when building a workplace safety and health program. “Creating opportunities for open dialogue encourages workers to raise safety and health concerns or report a work-related injury or illness without fear of retaliation.”

Other steps:

  • Be present. Implement an open-door policy so workers know they can talk to you about safety and health concerns during work hours.
  • Invite your workers to a safety discussion listening session.
  • Set up a physical or virtual suggestion box that workers can use to relay safety and health concerns.
  • Host a celebration or ceremony to recognize workers who make safety contributions, or invite them to have lunch with your CEO, president or other leaders to discuss safety.
  • Involve workers when setting annual safety and health goals. For example, invite them to “help research, brainstorm and decide on the appropriate targets.” Ensure workers at all levels of your organization can participate, regardless of skill level, status or education. Provide translation if needed.

McCraren Compliance assists employers in protecting their workers, starting with a comprehensive Work-site Analysis, Hazard Prevention, Controls, and Safety & Health Training.

Please contact us today at 888-758-4757 to learn how we can provide mine safety training and consulting for your business.

Don’t get struck

First published by Safety+Health an NSC publication

shpolicesafetyTips.jpg

Although most states enforce some type of “move over” law, which requires drivers to move over one lane or reduce speed when passing law enforcement on the side of the road, struck-by incidents are still happening.

More than 200 law enforcement officers were struck and killed between 2005 and 2019, according to NIOSH.

Officers can help lower their risk of being struck when responding to a road situation. Follow these tips from NIOSH:
Maintain situational awareness. “Keep your head on a swivel,” don’t turn your back to moving traffic and don’t walk in the gap between vehicles. Also, “always have an escape plan.”
Wear protective clothing. When exiting a patrol vehicle, put on an ANSI-approved high-visibility safety vest. This helps drivers see you.
Follow standard operating procedures. Your agency should have SOPs on temporary traffic control zones.
Understand the incident command structure. “Work collaboratively with other responders.”


McCraren Compliance can help you understand and comply with FMCSA, DOT and ADOT and ensure your drivers and your vehicles operate safely and efficiently.

Call us Today at 888-758-4757 or email us at info@mccrarencompliance.com to schedule your free FMCSA Compliance Assessment.

Ladders and overhead power lines

First published by Safety+Health an NSC publication
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From 1992 to 2005, at least 154 workers were killed after a metal ladder they were using came in contact with an overhead power line, according to Bureau of Labor Statistics data cited in a recent NIOSH review.

“As part of the site safety program and orientation,” NIOSH says, “make supervisors and workers aware of power line distances from work areas, including ladder length and ladder staging areas. Use site diagrams to communicate this information and ground-level signs or taped markers to remind workers of overhead power line locations.”

To help prevent injuries and fatalities, NIOSH recommends workers:

  • Look up. You need to know the location of overhead power lines before starting any job. “Always assume all overhead lines are energized and dangerous,” the agency says.
  • Don’t use metal ladders when working around or near overhead power lines.
  • Carry a ladder horizontally and in a lowered position when moving it. If a ladder is too long for one person to carry, ask for help.
  • Follow the 1:4 rule: “For every 4 feet between the ground and the upper point where a ladder is resting, set the feet of the ladder out 1 foot horizontally. For example, if the ladder is resting on the edge of a roof 16 feet above the ground, the bottom of the ladder should be 4 feet out from that edge.”
  • Don’t touch or go near a person or ladder that has come in contact with an overhead power line.

McCraren Compliance assists employers in protecting their workers, starting with a comprehensive Work-site Analysis, Hazard Prevention, Controls, and Safety & Health Training.

Please contact us today at 888-758-4757 to learn how we can provide mine safety training and consulting for your business.

MSHA won’t mandate COVID-19 vaccines, testing, acting administrator says

First published by Safety+Health an NSC publication

Arlington, VA — The Mine Safety and Health Administration will not require COVID-19 vaccination or weekly negative testing at the nation’s mines, Jeanette Galanis, MSHA deputy assistant secretary for policy and acting administrator, said during a Sept. 29 stakeholder conference call.

Galanis called the Federal Mine Safety and Health Act of 1977 “one of the strongest worker protection acts in the world.” Under the act, MSHA can issue hygiene citations and temporarily shut down mine operations at facilities in which the coronavirus is found to be spreading, a provision “very different” than the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, under which OSHA operates. An emergency rule under development by OSHA will require employers with at least 100 workers to ensure full vaccination or weekly negative testing of their workforce.

Galanis and other agency officials on the call pointed to updated guidance, issued by MSHA in March, that advises mine operators at coal, metal and nonmetal mines to establish a virus protection program or augment an existing one. Best practices include:

  • Conduct a hazard assessment of the mine site.
  • Identify various measures that help limit the spread of COVID-19 in mines.
  • Adopt measures to ensure miners who are infected or potentially infected are separated and sent home.
  • Implement anti-retaliation measures for miners who raise concerns related to COVID-19.

The guidance also includes recommendations on the use of personal protective equipment, physical distancing strategies, improving ventilation, effective hygiene and routine cleaning.

“We must be able to inspect mines during COVID,” Galanis said, “and so our mine inspectors are doing their jobs and getting out there and trying to be as careful as possible.”


McCraren Compliance offers many opportunities in safety training to help circumvent accidents. Please take a moment to visit our calendar of classes to see what we can do to help your safety measures from training to consulting.

COVID-19 whistleblowing

First published by Safety+Health an NSC publication

See the source image

New fact sheet from OSHA

Washington — A new fact sheet from OSHA details protections for employees who report workplace health and safety concerns related to COVID-19, and includes other relevant information for whistleblowers.

Section 11(c) of the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 contains anti-retaliation provisions for all employers except most federal, state and local government workers. U.S. Postal Service employees, however, are covered.

Activities related to COVID-19 that are protected include reporting an infection/exposure or unsafe condition to an employer or OSHA. The fact sheet provides examples of retaliation, including being fired or laid off.

OSHA notes that, under the OSH Act, the deadline for filing a retaliation complaint is 30 days after an employee “learns of the adverse action.” It also details what happens after a complaint is filed, what to do about a “dangerous situation” at work and what happens after a Section 11(c) investigation.

If an OSHA regional administrator dismisses the complaint, the employee may seek a review of the dismissal by the Directorate of Whistleblower Protection Programs by filing a request within 15 calendar days of receiving the dismissal letter.


McCraren Compliance assists employers in protecting their workers, starting with a comprehensive Work-site Analysis, Hazard Prevention, Controls, and Safety & Health Training.

Please contact us today at 888-758-4757 to learn how we can provide mine safety training and consulting for your business.