Creating workplaces where we all watch out for each other

Creating workplaces where we all watch out for each other

Christopher Williamson is new MSHA Administrator

First published by Safety+Health an NSC publication

Christopher Williamson is the new MSHA Administrator

Washington — The Senate on March 29 confirmed Christopher Williamson as the new administrator of the Mine Safety and Health Administration – MSHA.

Williamson takes over for acting administrator Jeannette Galanis. Former coal industry executive David Zatezalo was MSHA’s most recent Senate-confirmed leader, serving from November 2017 until January 2021.

On Nov. 12, President Joe Biden announced his intent to nominate Williamson, then-senior counsel to National Labor Relations Board Chair Lauren McFerran. The Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee advanced Williamson’s nomination by voice vote Feb. 10.

A native of West Virginia, Williamson worked at MSHA during the Obama administration, advising the assistant secretary on agency policy, operations and communications. He also has served as labor counsel to former Senate HELP Committee Chair Tom Harkin (D-IA) and as a legislative assistant to Sen. Joe Manchin (D-WV).


McCraren Compliance offers many opportunities in safety training to help circumvent accidents. Please take a moment to visit our calendar of classes to see what we can do to help your safety measures from training to consulting. Christopher Williamson is the new MSHA Administrator.

National Grain Safety Week set for April 4-8

First published by Stand Up 4 Grain Safety Week 
Photo: Stand Up 4 Grain Safety Week
A week of daily educational events for anyone who handles grain and an opportunity for an industry-wide focus on and commitment to safety.

About this event

Count On 3 Things at The 2022 Stand Up 4 Grain Safety Week!

We have some great things planned for each day of the Stand Up 4 Grain Safety Week, which is a convenient, virtual and FREE event for those in the grain industry to:

  1. Assess! What are your current safety plans and goals? Are there areas you’ve always wanted to improve or change but haven’t had the time or resources? This is your opportunity!
  2. Attend! Invest a bit of time each day of the Stand Up to receive free, convenient, virtual content with tips and resources that you can quickly implement into your operation!
  3. Apply! We know how hard it can be to carve time out of busy schedules to make lasting change BUT we’ve developed materials and resources to help make this easier! THIS is YOUR chance to make small changes for a big impact!

10 AM daily learning sessions during Stand Up Week offer a different focus and resources available to you!

NEW! Bonus & Spanish sessions at 2 PM Tuesday through Thursday.

Event Schedule:

  • Monday, April 4: Standup Kickoff Event – Livestreamed worker safety trainings focusing on safety around grain structures and equipment.
  • Tuesday, April 5: Electrical Safety
    • BONUS Session: Workplace Wellness, 2pm CST
  • Wednesday, April 6: Heat/Cold Stress and Other Extreme Weather Events
    • BONUS Session: Heat/Cold Stress and Extreme Weather Events (Espanol), 2pm CST
  • Thursday, April 7: Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)
    • BONUS Session: Workplace Wellness, 2pm CST, (Espanol)
  • Friday, April 8: STF’s, Crush, Struck-By Hazards

Visit https://standup4grainsafety.org/ for comprehensive event details and resources available to you!


McCraren Compliance offers many opportunities in safety training to help circumvent accidents. Please take a moment to visit our calendar of classes to see what we can do to help your safety measures from training to consulting.

Operation Safe Driver Week Is July 10-16 With Focus on Speeding

First published by CVSA

This year’s Operation Safe Driver Week is scheduled for July 10-16. Law enforcement personnel in Canada, Mexico and the U.S. will be on roadways throughout that week issuing warnings and citations to commercial motor vehicle and passenger vehicle drivers engaging in unsafe driving behaviors, such as speeding, distracted driving, following too closely, improper lane change, drunk or drugged driving, etc.

Earlier this month, the U.S. Department of Transportation’s National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHSTA) released its latest annual traffic crash report, showing that 38,824 lives were lost in traffic crashes nationwide in 2020 – the highest number of fatalities since 2007. And while the number of crashes and traffic injuries declined overall, fatal crashes increased by 6.8%.

Among the alarming statistics in NHTSA’s report was the key finding that speed-related fatalities increased by 17%. Consequently, speeding, in particular, will be a dangerous driving behavior that officers will identify and target during Operation Safe Driver Week.

“The rising fatalities on our roadways are a national crisis; we cannot and must not accept these deaths as inevitable,” said U.S. Transportation Secretary Pete Buttigieg.

The Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance’s (CVSA) Operation Safe Driver Program was created to improve the driving behaviors of all drivers and reduce the number of crashes involving commercial motor vehicles on our roadways through educational and traffic enforcement strategies. Operation Safe Driver Week was created by CVSA with support from federal agencies in Canada, Mexico and the U.S., the motor carrier industry, and transportation safety organizations.

“This safe driving initiative and campaign focuses specifically on drivers’ actions – whether it’s something a driver did, like speeding, or something they didn’t do, such as not paying attention to the driving task,” said CVSA President Capt. John Broers with the South Dakota Highway Patrol. “This focus on drivers’ behaviors is our effort to identify and educate drivers who are operating dangerously on our roadways, with the goal of preventing crashes from occurring.”

To find out about Operation Safe Driver Week enforcement events in your area, contact the agency or department responsible for overseeing commercial motor vehicle safety in your area.


McCraren Compliance can help you understand and comply with FMCSA, USDOT and ADOT and ensure your drivers and your vehicles operate safely and efficiently.

Call us today at 888-758-4757 or email us at info@mccrarencompliance.com to schedule your free FMCSA Compliance Assessment.

USDOL announces proposed rule to amend federal occupational injury, illness recordkeeping regulation

First published by OSHA

WASHINGTON – The U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration is proposing amendments to its occupational injury and illness recordkeeping regulation, 29 CFR 1904.41. The current regulation requires certain employers to electronically submit injury and illness information – that they are required to keep – to OSHA. The agency uses these reports to identify and respond to emerging hazards and makes aspects of the information publicly available.

In addition to reporting their Annual Summary of Work-Related Injuries and Illnesses, the proposed rule would require certain establishments in certain high-hazards industries to electronically submit additional information from their Log of Work-Related Injuries and Illnesses, as well as their Injury and Illness Incident Report.

As part of OSHA’s mission to protect workers and mitigate workplace hazards, this rule would improve OSHA’s ability to use its enforcement and compliance assistance resources to identify workplaces where workers are at high risk. The proposed rule would also advance the department’s mission to empower workers by increasing transparency in the workforce.

The proposed rule would:

  • Require establishments with 100 or more employees in certain high-hazard industries to electronically submit information from their OSHA Forms 300, 301 and 300A to OSHA once a year.
  • Update the classification system used to determine the list of industries covered by the electronic submission requirement.
  • Remove the current requirement for establishments with 250 or more employees not in a designated industry to electronically submit information from their Form 300A to OSHA annually.
  • Require establishments to include their company name when making electronic submissions to OSHA.

Establishments with 20 or more employees in certain high-hazard industries would continue to be required to electronically submit information from their OSHA Form 300A annual summary to OSHA annually.

Submit comments online using Docket No. OSHA-2021-0006 on the Federal eRulemaking Portal. Read the Federal Register notice for details. Comments must be submitted 60 days after the proposed rule is published in the Federal Register.

Learn more about OSHA’s Injury and Illness Recordkeeping and Reporting Requirements.


McCraren Compliance assists employers in protecting their workers, starting with a comprehensive Work-site Analysis, Hazard Prevention, Controls, and Safety & Health Training.

Please contact us today at 888-758-4757 to learn how we can provide mine safety training and consulting for your business.

FMCSA grants extension request to replace specified 3G dependent ELDs

First published by FMCSA

Photo property of FMCSA

Monday, March 28, 2022

Mobile carriers are shutting down their 3G networks. As a result, any ELD that requires 3G cellular connectivity to perform its functionality will no longer be in compliance after the 3G network it relies on is sunset. When in an area that does not support 3G, a 3G dependent device will register a malfunction. In accordance with 49 CFR 395.34, a carrier has 8 days to get the malfunction resolved, in this case by replacement, unless an extension is granted. Read more
FMCSA has granted an extension for any carriers using the ELDs below, allowing the carrier’s drivers to continue to use paper records of duty status in lieu of the ELD until the 3G dependent devices are replaced with a compliant 4G or 5G device. The devices covered under this extension are:

  1. Omnitracs Intelligent Vehicle Gateway; ELD Identifier: IVG001; Serial Numbers (SN) 108000000-108499999
  2. Blue Tree ELD; ELD Identifier: BT500
  3. Rand McNally; Device Name: Driver Connect, Model # DC200 Fleet
  4. Rand McNally; Device Name: Driver Connect, Model # DC200S
  5. Rand McNally; Device Name: TND 760, Model # 760
  6. Rand McNally; Device Name: TND 765, Model # 765
  7. Rand McNally; Device Name: HD100, Model # HD100 (Android; iOS)

A carrier must maintain the document granting this extension at the carrier’s principal place of business and keep a copy in each vehicle with a malfunctioning ELD. A driver must make the copy of this document available to a safety official upon request.

Download the Omnitracs extension document
Download the ORBCOMM extension document
Download the Rand McNally extension document


McCraren Compliance can help you understand and comply with FMCSA, USDOT and ADOT and ensure your drivers and your vehicles operate safely and efficiently.

Call us Today at 888-758-4757 or email us at info@mccrarencompliance.com to schedule your free FMCSA Compliance Assessment.


OSHA launches emphasis program to help protect Midwest workers from hazardous noise

First published by Safety+Health an NSC publication

Photo property of OSHA

Kansas City, MO — A new Regional Emphasis Program from OSHA is aimed at safeguarding workers in the Midwest from occupational noise hazards that can lead to permanent hearing loss.

About 70% of all workers are exposed to moderately loud noise levels, while more than 10% face harmful noise levels on the job, an OSHA press releases states, citing data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Meanwhile, NIOSH reports that more than half of noise-exposed workers say they don’t wear hearing protection.

Set to expire Oct. 1, 2026, the REP applies to employers in Kansas, Missouri and Nebraska, and targets general industry and construction establishments that “commonly have occupational noise hazard exposure which is causing or likely to cause injury, illness or permanent disability.” The program features two primary elements: outreach to encourage employers to address and correct hazards, and an inspection initiative to ensure necessary steps are taken to reduce noise hazards and prevent injuries.

OSHA requires employers to implement a hearing conservation program when the average noise exposure over 8 working hours reaches or exceeds 85 decibels. The agency provides hearing conservation guidelines.

“Hearing conservation programs are designed to protect workers’ hearing and prevent irreversible hearing loss,” Steven J. Kaplan, acting administrator of OSHA’s Region 7, said in the release. “These programs also provide employers and workers with the knowledge and equipment to control and reduce their exposure to noise.”


McCraren Compliance assists employers in protecting their workers, starting with a comprehensive Work-site Analysis, Hazard Prevention, Controls, and Safety & Health Training.

Please contact us today at 888-758-4757 to learn how we can provide mine safety training and consulting for your business.

ELD Update: New and updated FAQs from FMCSA

First published by FMCSA

On March 10, 2022, to provide additional guidance on the ELD regulations, FMCSA published the following frequently asked questions. To view any of the FAQs below, along with previously published FAQs, visit https://eld.fmcsa.dot.gov/faq.

New FAQs

Can an electronic logging device (ELD) allow for a user to switch between ELD mode and automatic onboard recording device (AOBRD mode)?

No. A provider may provide an AOBRD for drivers exempt from using an ELD per 49 CFR 395.8(a)(1)(iii), but the AOBRD must be a standalone application on a device, with its own driver account and login, separate from a registered, self-certified ELD operating system.

May electronic logging device (ELD) providers configure the ELD to identify potential hours of service violations?

The minimum functional specification requirements in the ELD rule do not require ELDs to identify hours of service violations; however, some ELD providers have elected to offer this as an add-on feature. If an ELD provider offers this add-on feature, but does not update their device to reflect the 2020 changes to the new hours of services rules, the ELD may inaccurately identify hours of service violations. Motor carriers should contact their ELD providers with specific questions about what information their ELD displays.

In section 4.4.2 of 49 CFR part 395, subpart B, Appendix A, the rule requires that “geo-location information must be derived from a database that contains all cities, towns, and villages with a population of 5,000 or greater and listed in ANSI INCITS 446–2008 (R2013).” What is an example of a database that meets these requirements?

USGS maintains the Federal authoritative source of official geographic feature names, known as the Geographic Names Information System (GNIS). Providers can start with the Populated Places dataset, which includes towns and villages of all populations. Therefore, it meets the minimum requirements (locations with populations of 5,000 or greater and listed in ANSI INCITS 446-2008 (R2013)). Providers may consider cross-referencing this dataset against another dataset to filter out cities, towns, and villages with a population of less than 5,000. To learn more about the GNIS and the Populated Places dataset, visit https://www.usgs.gov/tools/geographic-names-information-system-gnis.

Updated FAQs

Also on March 10, 2022, FMCSA revised several FAQs. The updated FAQs are below.

What steps must the driver and carrier take if an ELD malfunctions?
  1. The driver must inform their carrier of the malfunction within 24 hours.
  2. The motor carrier has 8 days to repair, service, or replace the ELD. If the malfunction precludes the device from accurately recording hours of service (HOS) data and presenting that HOS data to a safety official, the driver must user paper logs or another system for recording their HOS during this time.
  3. Under 49 CFR 395.34, a motor carrier seeking to extend the time permitted for repair, replacement, or service of one or more ELDs may request an extension. ELD malfunction extensions can be requested by email to ELD-Extension@dot.gov. You may also contact the field office directly. For more information, see https://eld.fmcsa.dot.gov/support.
If a driver is permitted to use a commercial motor vehicle (CMV) for personal reasons, how must the driving time be recorded?

There are two ways authorized personal use (personal conveyance, or “PC”) can be recorded using an electronic logging device (ELD):

  1. If the motor carrier has configured the driver user account to authorize personal use in accordance with 49 CFR 395.28(a), then the driver may use the personal conveyance special driving category to record that time.
  2. If the motor carrier has not configured the device to authorize personal conveyance, the driver may switch to Off Duty and annotate the beginning of personal conveyance period. Once the personal conveyance period has ended, the driver annotates the end event, as well as any events that occurred during that time period.
Can a user edit or change automatically recorded driving time that has been recorded by an electronic logging device (ELD) to non-driving time?

Under sections 4.3.2.8.2(b) of 49 CFR part 395, subpart B, Appendix A, automatically recorded drive time when the commercial motor vehicle (CMV) is in motion cannot be edited or changed to non-driving time.

Edits to automatically recorded driving time are acceptable in the following instances:

  1. For team drivers, a driver may edit and reassign driving time records erroneously recorded to their account (see section 4.3.2.8.2(b)(2) of Appendix A). The drivers must have indicated each other as co-drivers in their record of duty status (RODS). Each co-driver must confirm the change for the edit to take effect.
  2. A driver may edit or correct driving time erroneously recorded due to failing to change his or her duty status before powering off the CMV, but only if the driving time was recorded by the ELD while the vehicle was powered off and the vehicle was not in motion during the period that is being edited or corrected. The driver edit limitation found in section 4.3.2.8.2(b) prohibits the editing of automatically recorded driving time. The intent of the specification that requires automatic recording of driving time is to ensure all movement of the CMV is captured. A CMV cannot be driven while powered off. The driving time following the power off cycle of a CMV not in motion, is not recorded to the specifications required by 4.3.1.2 and 4.4.1.1 and therefore may be edited to the correct duty status.
  3. Driving time assumed from the unidentified driver profile in error may be returned to the unidentified driver profile so that it can be assumed by the correct driver (see section 4.2.3.8.2(b)(1) of Appendix A).
  4. Drivers may assume a subset of driving time from the unidentified driver profile. The amount of automatically recorded drive time may not change, but can be split between the driver and the unidentified driver profile so that the remaining time can be assumed by the correct driver.
  5. Drivers may assume driving time from the unidentified driving profile and convert it to Off-Duty (PC) or On-Duty Not Driving (YM) if this is that status that should have been in effect (see section 4.3.2.2.2 of Appendix A).
As a motor carrier, how can I be sure an electronic logging device (ELD) is compliant?

The motor carrier is responsible for checking that their device is registered, as established in 49 CFR 395.22. Motor carriers should only purchase an ELD that is self-certified by the manufacturer to be compliant and that is registered and listed on the FMCSA website.

The list of registered ELDs can be found at https://eld.fmcsa.dot.gov/List. Motor carriers should also familiarize themselves with the ELD checklist and the ELD rule.

In the event that an ELD is removed from the registration list, FMCSA will place the removed device on FMCSA’s Revoked ELDs List.

What procedure should be followed if an electronic logging device (ELD) is replaced or reset?
For a reset or replaced ELD, under 49 CFR 395.8(k), data or documents showing the driver’s record of duty status (RODS) for the current 24-hour period and the previous 7 days must still be retained. These can either be uploaded into the “new” ELD or retained in paper format.
During an investigation, how should the header section reflect electronic logging device (ELD) data?

The header should be populated with the commercial motor vehicle (CMV) data and co-driver data (if applicable) at the end of the report period. The actual date and location information must be reflected as required in the ELD data.

If a Canada/Mexico-domiciled company with a terminal in the United States dispatches a driver from one of its Canada/Mexico locations to move a vehicle to its U.S. terminal for use in the U.S., is the vehicle move considered a drive-away/tow-away operation?

No, because the movement does not meet does not the definition of “drive-away/tow-away operation” in 49 CFR 390.5T.

Additional Updates

The following questions and answers have received minor wording updates. These changes did not alter the substance of the information. Click the links below to read the full revised questions and answers.

Are Canada- and Mexico-domiciled drivers required to use electronic logging devices (ELDs) when they are operating in the United States (U.S)?Read the answer

What is the process for transferring data via email?Read the answer

How do electronic logging device (ELD) providers register their ELDs with FMCSA?Read the answer

Does the size requirement for print display listed in section 4.8.1.3(c)(1) of 49 CFR part 395 subpart B Appendix A also apply to the on-screen display?Read the answer

Is the display required to be handed to the inspector outside of the vehicle?Read the answer

Section 4.9.1 of 49 CFR part 395, subpart B, Appendix A states than an electronic logging device (ELD) must support either telematics or local transfer for data transfer. Can an ELD offer web services and USB transfer?Read the answer

What is the resolution process if the FMCSA data transfer mechanism incorrectly rejects a data file during an electronic data transfer?Read the answer

To ensure that the list of self-certified electronic logging devices (ELDs) is current, ELD providers must notify FMCSA of any major changes to their device. What constitutes a major change to an ELD?Read the answer

These FAQs and more are on the ELD website at: https://eld.fmcsa.dot.gov/FAQ.


McCraren Compliance can help you understand and comply with FMCSA, USDOT and ADOT and ensure your drivers and your vehicles operate safely and efficiently.

Call us Today at 888-758-4757 or email us at info@mccrarencompliance.com to schedule your free FMCSA Compliance Assessment.

MSHA celebrates women in mining

First published by MSHA

Women's History Month MSHA Graphic

Photo: MSHA

Throughout America’s history, women have played a critical role in mines and mining operations, often in the face of prejudice and other hardships due to their gender. During Women’s History Month, we recognize the contributions women have made in the mining industry and their role in creating opportunities and better working conditions in mines.

Here are a few milestones from the history of women in mining:

1860s:

  • In the nineteenth century, women worked in mining as prospectors, ore processors, miners, managers and mine owners. Women “grubstakers” sometimes financed the initial cost of prospecting in return for part-interest in any claim.  In 1863, Mrs. Robert K. Reid discovered a vein of silver ore and filed a claim in her own name in Bingham Canyon, Utah, the site of one of our nation’s largest mines.

1890s:

  • In the 1890s, two schoolteachers from Seattle, Washington, Annie A. Coffin and Stella L. Goodspeed, discovered a rich mining property in the Goat Lake area of the Cascade Range.  Coffin and Goodspeed rode the train from Seattle to Hartford and then, carrying packs of equipment and armed with revolvers and extra ammunition, walked 35 miles into the mountains, and climbed 3,000 feet up Mt. Monte Cristo.  Their finds were heralded by the Seattle Times on July 7, 1896, in headlines that read, “Gold was willing. Two Seattle teachers discover rich mines.”

1960s:

  • Though no federal law prohibited women from working in the mining industry, tradition, cultural restraints and employer resistance all limited women’s opportunities for employment in mining. This began to change in the 1960s.
  • On September 24, 1965, President Lyndon B. Johnson signed executive order 11246, stating that coal companies with federal contracts could not discriminate in employment because of a person’s race or sex. The law was on the books, but women still faced discrimination in the industry. President Richard Nixon signed the Equal Employment Opportunity Act of 1972, which expanded and strengthened the scope of equal employment. This law allowed women to become more forceful with discrimination charges against coal companies.

1970s:

  • In 1974, Diana Baldwin, a former hospital receptionist, and Anita Cherry, a former practical nurse, became the first women to work in a coal mine. They were also the first female members of the United Mine Workers of America to work inside a mine.
  • By the mid-1970s, the largest American coal companies with federal contracts began hiring female miners with more regularity. A major administrative complaint, filed with the U.S. Department of Labor in 1978 against 153 of the nation’s largest coal companies and mines, expanded job opportunities for women in the industry.
  • Many of these newly hired women worked in underground mines in the Appalachian coalfields.  Between 1974 and 1980, almost 2,400 women were hired as underground coal workers in the Eastern U.S., while only 242 were hired in the Midwest, and 272 in the West. Underground coal mines required a larger workforce than other types of mines.

Read more about women in mining.


McCraren Compliance offers many opportunities in safety training to help circumvent accidents. Please take a moment to visit our calendar of classes to see what we can do to help your safety measures from training to consulting.

National Work Zone Awareness Week

First published by USDOT

Each year in the spring, National Work Zone Awareness Week (NWZAW) is held to bring national attention to motorist and worker safety and mobility issues in work zones. Since 1999, FHWA has worked with the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO) and the American Traffic Safety Services Association (ATSSA) to coordinate and sponsor the event. The first national event was held at a work zone in Springfield, VA in April 2000. Over the years, other transportation partners have joined the effort to support NWZAW. In addition to a national event conducted each year, many States host their own NWZAW events.

2022 National Work Zone Awareness Week, April 11-15 – Work Zones are a Sign to Slow Down.

This year, the Virginia Department of Transportation (VDOT) is hosting the 2022 National Work Zone Awareness Week kick-off event on April 12 with the theme, “Work Zones are a Sign to Slow Down.”

PARTICIPATE

 The National Work Zone Awareness Week (NWZAW) has been successful in spreading awareness for work zone safety across the country because of participation from organizations and individuals just like you. Hundreds of companies and individuals reach out to ATSSA on social media each year using #NWZAW.

Everyone plays a role in work zone safety. NWZAW highlights the deadly dangers of inattention at highway work areas. Make plans now for the weeklong commemoration including:

  • Work Zone Safety Training Day – April 11
  • National kickoff event – April 12
  • Go Orange Day – April 13
  • Social media storm – April 14
  • Moment of Silence – April 15

The moment of silence is new for 2022 and remembers the people whose lives were lost in a work zone incident. Find other local events submitted to this website. Learn more on how you can participate and make your voice count on the importance of work zone safety.


McCraren Compliance offers many opportunities in safety training to help circumvent accidents. Please take a moment to visit our calendar of classes to see what we can do to help your safety measures from training to consulting.

Distracted Driving Awareness Month

First published by National Safety Council

Distracted Driving Awareness Month

Photo: NSC

April is Distracted Driving Awareness Month and new NSC estimates show that our roads are the most dangerous they’ve been in years; on a typical day, eight people are killed and hundreds more are injured in distraction-affected crashes. Your workers face distracted driving risks on every trip, from the driveway to the parking lot and back home again.

This April, team with NSC to spread the word that distracted driving, including hands-free phone use and infotainment systems, puts everyone at risk. Sign up for free, ready-to-use resources to create a distracted driving program that engages your workforce and reminds everyone to #JustDrive.

“Drivers using cellphones are four times more likely to crash, and hands-free phone use offers no safety benefit,” the council says.

Be a focused driver.

What’s that? NSC says a focused driver:

  • Adjusts vehicle controls such as mirrors, seat, radio and air temperature before driving.
  • Programs the GPS before leaving.
  • Plans ahead – determines routes, directions and checks traffic conditions before departing.
  • Doesn’t multitask behind the wheel.
  • Doesn’t talk on a cellphone – even hands-free – or interact with the vehicle’s infotainment system.
  • Doesn’t reach down or behind the seat, pick up items from the floor, or clean the inside of the window while driving.
  • Doesn’t eat or drink while behind the wheel.

Take the NSC Just Drive Pledge

Commit to driving distraction-free by taking the NSC Just Drive Pledge and help us make the roads safer for everyone with a donation to our lifesaving mission.


McCraren Compliance can help you understand and comply with FMCSA, USDOT and ADOT and ensure your drivers and your vehicles operate safely and efficiently.

Call us today at 888-758-4757 or email us at info@mccrarencompliance.com to schedule your free FMCSA Compliance Assessment.