OSHA and the ASA sign Ambassador Alliance to continue protecting temporary workers

First published by OSHA

WASHINGTON – An eight-year alliance between the U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and the American Staffing Association (ASA), established to improve the workplace safety and health of temporary workers, continues to be valuable and productive. OSHA and ASA signed an Ambassador document on August 9, 2022, in recognition of ASA’s demonstrated commitment to collaborating with the agency to improve safety and health practices and programs in American workplaces.

The goal of an Ambassador is to continue the longstanding relationships between OSHA and Alliance participants through ongoing outreach and information-sharing, and training.

Brittany Sakata, ASA general counsel (left) and  Doug Parker, OSHA assistant secretary
Brittany Sakata, ASA general counsel (left) and Doug Parker, OSHA assistant secretary

OSHA and ASA first signed an alliance in 2014 and it was renewed in 2016. Their collaboration has resulted in several successful initiatives and activities, including:

“Temporary workers are, by law, afforded the same workplace protections as permanent employees,” said Assistant Secretary of Labor for Occupational Safety and Health Doug Parker. “We are grateful for ASA’s continued dedication to helping OSHA educate temporary workers about their rights and train host employers and staffing agencies on their responsibilities to protect the safety and health of this vital part of the workforce.”

ASA, founded in 1966, is the voice of the U.S. staffing, recruiting and workforce solutions industry. ASA and its state affiliates advance the interests of the industry across all sectors through advocacy, research, education, and the promotion of high standards of legal, ethical, and professional practices.

Through the Alliance Program, OSHA works with organizations such as trade and professional associations, labor unions, educational institutions, community and faith-based groups, and government agencies to share information about OSHA’s initiatives and compliance assistance resources with workers and employers, and educate workers and employers about their rights and responsibilities.


McCraren Compliance assists employers in protecting their workers, starting with a comprehensive Work-site Analysis, Hazard Prevention, Controls, and Safety & Health Training.

Please contact us today at 888-758-4757 to learn how we can provide mine safety training and consulting for your business.

Truck Parking Safety Improvement Act advances out of House committee

First published by Safety+Health an NSC publication

Photo: Missouri Department of Transportation

Washington — The House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee on July 20 approved an updated version of the bipartisan Truck Parking Safety Improvement Act.

Sponsored by Rep. Mike Bost (R-IL), H.R. 2187 would address a nationwide shortage of safe parking spots for commercial motor vehicle drivers, who are required under federal hours-of-service regulations to park and rest after being on duty for long periods.

“Since at least 2002, the U.S. Department of Transportation has identified the growing shortage of truck parking spaces as an issue of national concern that jeopardizes the safety of truck drivers and the motoring public,” Bost said during a committee hearing. “Often, truck drivers have been unable to find safe places to park their vehicles and are forced to use sides of the roads and off-ramps. This leads to accidents when other motorists don’t expect the truck to be parked on the side of the road.

“The longer we allow this problem to go on, the worse it’s going to get for the trucking industry.”

The bill would allow the transportation secretary to issue grants for projects that provide truck parking – $175 million for fiscal year 2023 and a combined $580 million over the next three fiscal years. Entities eligible for the grants include states, metropolitan planning organizations, local governments, an agency of a state or local government “carrying out responsibilities relating to CMV parking,” a tribal government or a consortium of tribal governments, and a multistate or multijurisdictional group. Grantees would be permitted to partner with private entities “to carry out an eligible project.”

During a media roundtable at the Mid-America Trucking Show in March, Robin Hutcheson, acting administrator of the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration, acknowledged that the agency was “really feeling the urgency” to address the lack of safe parking. She added that FMCSA was collaborating with the Federal Highway Administration to try to fix the issue.

A month earlier, in a letter sent to Transportation Secretary Pete Buttigieg, Chris Spear, president and CEO of the American Trucking Associations, and Todd Spencer, president and CEO of the Owner-Operator Independent Drivers Association, called on the Department of Transportation to prioritize funding from the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act to address the lack of safe parking for CMV drivers.

They requested that the department work with the Biden administration, state DOTs, Congress and industry stakeholders “to ensure appropriate actions are taken to mitigate the growing truck parking shortage.”

The bill, introduced March 26, 2021, initially had three Democrats and two Republicans listed as co-sponsors. That list has since grown to 37 lawmakers from both side of the aisle.

The legislation now goes before the full House for a vote, which has not yet been scheduled.


McCraren Compliance can help you understand and comply with FMCSA, USDOT and ADOT and ensure your drivers and your vehicles operate safely and efficiently.

Call us Today at 888-758-4757 or email us at info@mccrarencompliance.com to schedule your free FMCSA Compliance Assessment.

Safe Operation of Overhead Cranes

First published by Safety+Health an NSC publication

Serious injuries and even death can occur if overhead cranes aren’t inspected and properly used.

Injuries have been reported after workers were struck by a load, or pinched between the load and another object. OSHA’s Crane, Hoist and Monorail Alliance offers general safety tips for overhead crane operators:

  • Don’t attempt to lengthen wire rope or repair damaged wire rope.
  • Don’t allow a welding electrode to be touched to the wire rope.
  • Use your experience, knowledge and training to assess risks and follow procedures.
  • Never operate a crane and hoist that’s damaged or has any actual or suspected mechanical or electrical problems.
  • Don’t use the wire rope, any part of the crane, hoist, or the load block and hook as a ground for welding.
  • Never remove or obscure warning labels on the crane or hoist.
  • Don’t walk – or allow anyone else to – under a suspended load.
  • Don’t perform any work on a suspended load that requires a worker to be positioned under the load.

McCraren Compliance assists employers in protecting their workers, starting with a comprehensive Work-site Analysis, Hazard Prevention, Controls, and Safety & Health Training.

Please contact us today at 888-758-4757 to learn how we can provide mine safety training and consulting for your business.

Exploring or playing at active and abandoned mine sites is dangerous, potentially fatal 

First published by MSHA
MSHA Stay Out Stay Alive Logo for 2021

Photo property of MSHA

Water-filled quarries and pits hide rock ledges, old machinery and other hazards.  The water can be deceptively deep and dangerously cold.  Steep, slippery walls make exiting the water difficult.  Hills of loose material can easily collapse on an unsuspecting biker or climber.  Vertical shafts can be hundreds of feet deep and may be completely unprotected, or hidden by vegetation.

Even so dozens of people are injured or killed while exploring or playing on mine property every year.  The men and women employed in our nation’s mines are trained to work in a safe manner.  For trespassers, hazards are not always apparent.

For example:

  • Water-filled quarries can not only hide rock ledges but can also contain dangerous electric currents that become deadly under water.
  • Abandoned mine shafts that may seem fun to explore can unexpectedly collapse.

As students return to school while the weather is still warm and water seems inviting, it is more important than ever to remind people to stay out of abandoned or active mine sites like quarries and pits – and stay alive.

Visit https://www.abandonedmines.gov/staying-safe to learn more about abandoned mine and quarry accidents. Please help us raise awareness about this summertime danger. Most importantly, remind people to Stay Out, Stay Alive!


McCraren Compliance assists employers in protecting their workers, starting with a comprehensive Work-site Analysis, Hazard Prevention, Controls, and Safety & Health Training.