Operating Equipment Near Water – Safety Alert

Safety Alert 

Operating Equipment Near Water 

From 2010 through 2023, there were 19 drowning accidents. Eleven of these fatal accidents occurred when mobile equipment, operating near water, became submerged. When working near water mine operators should:

  • Conduct workplace examinations and eliminate hazardous conditions.
  • Keep mobile equipment a safe distance from the water’s edge.
  • Ensure miners wear a seatbelt when operating mobile equipment.

Emergency underwater breathing devices are commercially available, and they come in all different shapes and sizes. If made available and miners are properly trained, these devices can potentially increase miners’ chances of survival if they fall into water.

 

Eleven of these fatal accidents occurred when mobile equipment, operating near water, became submerged.
Best Practices
  • Provide emergency underwater breathing devices to miners with risk of falling into water.
  • Train miners in the use of underwater breathing devices in case of an emergency.
  • Keep water rescue equipment easily accessible.
  • To assist miners in exiting a submerged cab, develop an underwater emergency egress kit which may include a nose clip, mask, underwater breathing device, PFD, and glass breaking device.
  • Provide and ensure miners wear a Coast Guard approved Type I or Type V personal flotation device (PFD).

McCraren Compliance offers a full range of safety and health training and consulting services. Plus we can help you incorporate well-being into your traditional systems in order to support the Total Worker Health of your workforce.

Call 888-758-4757, email info@mccrarencompliance.com or visit our website www.mccrarencompliance.com

Original article published by MSHA

Gender-based violence in construction: DOL to host webinar

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Photo: Missouri Department of Transportation Flickr

Washington — OSHA and the Department of Labor Women’s Bureau have scheduled a free webinar exploring gender-based violence and harassment in the construction industry.

Slated for 2 p.m. Eastern on March 5, the hourlong webinar will focus on “how GBVH impacts worker health and safety,” and how it can be addressed. A construction worker, an employer, representatives from stakeholder groups and a representative from the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission are set to give presentations.

The webinar will offer Spanish interpretation services. It’ll be the second in a series of four on GBVH. OSHA and the Women’s Bureau are set to examine the issue in the service industry on Feb. 22.


McCraren Compliance offers a full range of safety and health training and consulting services. Plus we can help you incorporate well-being into your traditional systems in order to support the Total Worker Health of your workforce.

Call 888-758-4757, email info@mccrarencompliance.com or visit our website www.mccrarencompliance.com

Original article published by Safety+Health an NSC publication

Now Available: PHMSA’s Redesigned Pipeline Safety Enforcement Transparency Webpage

PHMSA’s Office of Pipeline Safety’s Enforcement Division launched a redesigned enforcement transparency page on February 16 to provide a centralized location for enforcement data and documents, improve the user experience for greater accessibility, and to advance PHMSA’s safety mission.

The enhanced webpage includes the following updates:
  • Centralized Data: Enforcement information stored in one central location.
  • Ease of Navigation: Users can quickly navigate back to the main page by utilizing a link in the left column menu.
Enhanced lookup capabilities
  • User-Friendly Interface: Enhanced lookup capabilities with filters provide a user-friendly experience, making it easier for users to search for Operators by Operator ID or Name.
  • Efficient Searching: Improved lookup capabilities contribute to efficient data retrieval, supporting users in finding relevant information quickly.
Mobile-friendly design
  • User Accessibility: The mobile-friendly design addresses the growing trend of mobile users, providing a positive user experience across devices.
  • Responsive Design: Optimizing viewing and usability on mobile phones demonstrates a commitment to adaptability and accessibility.
Accessing the PHMSA’s Enforcement Transparency webpage remains easy and includes the following steps:
1.    Start at PHMSA’s home page at https://www.phmsa.dot.gov/
2.    Hover over “Regulations and Compliance.”
3.    Click on “Enforcement.”
4.    Click on “Pipeline Enforcement.”
5.    Click on “Enforcement Transparency Webpage” and you’re there!

Contact PHMSA’s Office of Governmental, International, and Public Affairs (phmsapublicaffairs@dot.gov) for more information.


McCraren Compliance can help you understand and comply with FMCSA, USDOT and ADOT and ensure your drivers and your vehicles operate safely and efficiently.

Call us Today at 888-758-4757 or email us at info@mccrarencompliance.com to schedule your free FMCSA Compliance Assessment.

Original article published by PHMSA

FMCSA and PHMSA Issue Safety Advisory for Nurse Tanks

Safety Advisory:
Possible Catastrophic Failure of Nurse Tanks and
Recommendation for Periodic Testing

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) and the Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA) issue this safety advisory to provide notice of the possibility of catastrophic failure of certain hazardous materials packages commonly known as “nurse tanks.” See Title 49, Code of Federal Regulations (49 CFR) §173.315(m).

Background
This notice focuses on nurse tanks manufactured from January 1, 2007, through December 31, 2011, by American Welding and Tank (AWT) at its Fremont, Ohio plant. Nurse tanks manufactured by AWT from 2009 to 2010 were the subject of a prior FMCSA investigation and enforcement action in response to improper manufacturing procedures.

On August 23, 2023, a 2009 AWT nurse tank containing anhydrous ammonia experienced a catastrophic failure in a farm co-op lot, resulting in the release of all product. The failure caused the tank shell to “rocket” over 300 feet from its original location. While no injuries were reported, this event is an indicator of potential continuing problems with AWT nurse tanks that have now been in service for over a decade.

As a result of this incident, the owner of the nurse tank involved contracted with a third-party testing company to examine their AWT nurse tanks that were manufactured between 2008 and 2012. Radiographic testing showed that 7 of 8 the nurse tanks tested had extreme stress corrosion cracking, porosity, and inclusions/voids in the welds where the heads and shells of the nurse tanks were joined. Only the 2012 tank passed. The nurse tank owner submitted these results to engineering experts who were involved in previous research funded by FMCSA into similar issues with this series of AWT nurse tanks.1 Based on the test results and the review by the experts, the owner voluntarily placed the nurse tanks out-of-service.  The parent company of the farm co-op subsequently conducted similar radiographic testing on 142 AWT nurse tanks manufactured between 2007 and 2012, and 100 failed the test.  All 2012 tanks passed.

Recommendation
The current Hazardous Materials Regulations (49 CFR Parts 171-180) do not require periodic inspection and testing of nurse tanks that have attached and legible American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) identification plates and that meet the other requirements in 49 CFR §173.315(m)(1). Requirements for periodic inspection and testing of nurse tanks apply only when the ASME plate is missing or illegible. See 49 CFR §173.315(m)(2).

The FMCSA and PHMSA nevertheless strongly recommend that owners of AWT nurse tanks manufactured between January 1, 2007, and December 31, 2011 that are exempted from periodic inspection and testing requirements as described above, conduct voluntary periodic visual inspection in accordance with 49 CFR §173.315(m)(2)(i); thickness testing in accordance with 49 CFR §173.315(m)(2)(ii), and pressure testing in accordance with 49 CFR §173.315(m)(2)(iii). Note these dates reflect the years of manufacture that failed testing.

For owners of affected AWT nurse tanks unable to conduct voluntary pressure testing, FMCSA and PHMSA recommend that either radiographic or ultrasonic testing be conducted. While the period of voluntary inspection and testing is at the discretion of the nurse tank owner, FMCSA and PHMSA recommend conducting the inspection and testing at least once every five years consistent with 49 CFR §173.315(m)(2)(iv).

Additional Information
FMCSA and PHMSA are committed to the safety of the farming community and the public. The agencies will be engaged with stakeholders through a variety of outreach activities intended to emphasize the importance of this recommendation and its implications for the owners of these nurse tanks.

For more information, or if you have a question concerning this Safety Advisory, please contact Paul Bomgardner, Chief, FMCSA Hazardous Materials Division, at (202) 493-0027, or by email at paul.bomgardner@dot.gov.


McCraren Compliance can help you understand and comply with FMCSA, USDOT and ADOT and ensure your drivers and your vehicles operate safely and efficiently.

Call us Today at 888-758-4757 or email us at info@mccrarencompliance.com to schedule your free FMCSA Compliance Assessment.

Original article published by FMCSA

Have an idea for a new PPE safety standard?

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Photo: International Safety Equipment Association

Arlington, VA — The International Safety Equipment Association has launched an online portal to solicit ideas for workplace consensus standards.

“Through the new Safety Standards Idea Portal, ISEA will identify and review new concepts, emerging trends, and gaps in the occupational safety and health industry,” a press release states.

“Innovation is essential to ensure we’re meeting our commitment to keeping workers safe through the use of PPE and safety equipment,” ISEA President and CEO Cam Mackey said in the release. “By gathering ideas for new standards, we can identify unmet needs in the market, ultimately helping to transform safety practices in the workplace.

“This new standards proposal process aims to streamline and modernize standards development, promote inclusivity, and drive continuous improvement in safety protocols.”

Submissions won’t include identifiable information – personal or organizational. ISEA volunteer leaders and workplace safety and health experts will evaluate proposals on a rolling basis.

ISEA has scheduled a webinar for noon Eastern on Feb. 28 to detail the submission process, guidelines and form.


McCraren Compliance offers many opportunities in safety training to help circumvent accidents. Please take a moment to visit our calendar of classes to see what we can do to help your safety measures from training to consulting.

Original article published by Safety+Health an NSC publication

OSHA issues a ‘hazard huddle’ challenge

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Photo: OSHA

Washington — OSHA has launched a challenge aimed at boosting worker participation in implementing hazard controls and job hazard analyses.

As part of the annual Safe+Sound campaign promoted by OSHA, NIOSH, the National Safety Council and other safety organizations, the Hazard Huddle Challenge encourages managers to have discussions with workers about workplace safety hazards.

Assemble workers with “varied experience levels and roles,” OSHA says, to ensure an expanded range of expertise.

Discussion questions may include:

  • Where have you or your co-workers had “close calls” that could have caused an injury? What happened?
  • How have you been hurt or injured on the job? What happened?
  • Describe a worst-case scenario for an injury on the job. Where and how might this happen?
  • Are there jobs workers perform that don’t align with organizational operating procedures?
  • What jobs typically are assigned to newer and less experienced staff? How could they get hurt performing those tasks?

OSHA calls on managers to listen and take notes during these meetings to determine where to conduct job hazard analyses. Managers preparing to implement hazard controls are reminded to consult workers whose jobs may be affected before doing so.

The agency asks participants to highlight their actions and progress on social media using the hashtag #SafeAndSoundAtWork. A virtual challenge coin is available for download for individuals who complete the challenge.


McCraren Compliance offers a full range of safety and health training and consulting services. Plus we can help you incorporate well-being into your traditional systems in order to support the Total Worker Health of your workforce.

Call 888-758-4757, email info@mccrarencompliance.com or visit our website www.mccrarencompliance.com

Original article published by Safety+Health an NSC publication

Construction worker suicide: New video talks about mental health, stigma

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Photo: Mechanical Contractors Association of America

Rockville, MD — Mental health is “just as important for your safety as that harness or anything else that you’re wearing,” Mechanical Contractors Association of America member Ricky Reams says in a new video.

MCAA’s video spotlights mental health awareness and suicide prevention in the construction industry, which has experienced elevated rates of suicide.

Experts say physical strain, deadline pressure and a macho culture may make it more difficult for workers to talk about mental health struggles.

“There’s fear of shame. We’re going to be judged,” Brandon Anderson, vice president of safety at AGC of Missouri and a survivor of previous suicide attempts, says in the video. “The guilt that, ‘I’m not strong enough to deal with that.’”

Sally Spencer-Thomas, a psychologist and international speaker on mental health awareness and suicide prevention, calls on the industry to reduce stigma around mental health.

“The thing that makes you really good at this job – tough-mindedness, stoicism, decisiveness, perseverance; you’ve got to have that to be able to do this work – is also the thing that makes you most vulnerable to suicide and overdose because you are least likely to reach out for support,” Spencer-Thomas said.

“What that culture tells you is to be self-reliant, to [bear through it], whatever the thing is. It’s stress. It’s pain. You just keep pushing. And that doesn’t work well for any kind of health issue. We have to change that culture.”

Anderson reminds construction professionals who suspect a worker is struggling to approach them with compassion.

Spencer-Thomas offers additional tips:

  • Start with expression of care: “I care about you. You matter to me.”
  • Tell them, “I’ve noticed …” – and then list specific behaviors or things that have changed, suggesting they don’t seem like themselves lately.
  • “Tell me what’s going on, tell me what’s happening for you.”
  • Listen with empathy and compassion.
  • If enough warning signs are present, pivot and ask directly, “Are you thinking about suicide?”

MCAA highlights resources including the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline number – 988.


Now hear this: NIOSH announces Safe-in-Sound award winners

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Photo: NIOSH

Albuquerque, NM — Army Lt. Col. Kara Cave and Dow Chemical Co. are the respective recipients of the 2024 NIOSH Safe-in-Sound Innovation and Excellence in Hearing Loss Prevention Awards.

The awards recognize organizations and professionals who implement effective practices or innovations to help prevent noise-induced hearing loss and tinnitus among workers exposed to noise on the job.

Cave, chief of the Womack Army Medical Center’s hearing program at Fort Liberty in North Carolina, was recognized for using a data-driven approach to demonstrate the benefits of various clinical and program initiatives, along with gathering management support and investment for programs that are designed to prevent hearing loss, evaluate fitness for duty and assess the effects of specialized hearing protectors on situational awareness.

Cave also led a team that conducted an analysis of hearing care capabilities and policies, in addition to identifying feasible steps that significantly improved prevention as well as clinical and rehabilitative services.

Dow Chemical Co., which has a presence in 160 countries, worked to change a workplace culture that previously hadn’t prioritized noise control among its operations.

Dow gathered testimonials from workers and broadcast initial noise control and other interventions across the organization on topics related to noise exposure, hearing difficulties, stress and communication challenges. The company then disseminated solutions and mechanisms for facilities to address their specific noise issues.

Among the efforts were reducing sound levels below the NIOSH recommended 85-dBa limit for 8-hour noise exposures, adopting inclusive criteria in the company’s comprehensive hearing loss prevention program, completing multiple noise-control studies throughout business units to identify noise sources impacting worker exposures and adopting “buy quiet” policies.

Nominations for the 2025 Safe-in-Sound awards are being accepted through Aug. 19. To submit a nomination, email nominations@safeinsound.us.


McCraren Compliance offers many opportunities in safety training to help circumvent accidents. Please take a moment to visit our calendar of classes to see what we can do to help your safety measures from training to consulting.

Original article published by Safety+Health an NSC publication

Safety part of contractors group guide on AI in construction

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Photo: metamorworks/iStockphoto

Washington — Artificial intelligence in construction is the subject of a new technology guide from Associated Builders and Contractors.

Along with defining common AI terms, the guide provides an overview of AI uses during the span of a construction project – from preconstruction to building maintenance. It also includes best practices for AI policy and links to more information.

AI has the potential to help “contractors complete projects on time, minimize staffing challenges, save money, and improve health and safety,” Matt Abeles, vice president of construction technology and innovation at ABC, said in a press release. “The construction industry is faced with a steep worker shortage of more than half of a million in 2024, and promising technologies like AI can help address this challenge.

“As younger workers become industry leaders, we must approach AI in construction as beneficial with a balanced view that includes continuous evaluation, developing ethical guidelines, and increasing awareness about what AI can and cannot do.”


McCraren Compliance offers a full range of safety and health training and consulting services. Plus we can help you incorporate well-being into your traditional systems in order to support the Total Worker Health of your workforce.

Call 888-758-4757, email info@mccrarencompliance.com or visit our website www.mccrarencompliance.com

Original article published by Safety+Health an NSC publication

Get ready for the National Safety Stand-Down to Prevent Falls in Construction

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Photo: OSHA

Washington — OSHA is encouraging employers to take a break and raise awareness of fall hazards and the importance of fall protection during the National Safety Stand-Down to Prevent Falls in Construction.

This year’s event is set for May 6-10. Falls from elevation accounted for 395 of the nearly 1,100 construction deaths in 2022, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Employers and workers can take part in activities such as toolbox talks, safety equipment inspections, rescue plan development or in-depth discussions on hazardous tasks.

Meanwhile, employers whose workers aren’t exposed to fall hazards can “use this opportunity to have a conversation with employees about the other job hazards they face, protective methods, and the company’s safety policies and goals,” OSHA says. “It can also be an opportunity for employees to talk to management about fall and other job hazards they see.”

Resources include suggestions to prepare for a successful stand-down and highlights from past events. A webpage lists events that are free and open to the public to help employers and workers find events near them.

Employers can download a certification of participation after the stand-down and share their activities on social media using the hashtag #StandDown4Safety.

OSHA initiated a National Emphasis Program on falls in May and hosted a webinar titled “Preventing Falls Through Improved Design” in March 2023.