Safe Use of Extension Cords

First published by Safety+Health an NSC publication

Extension cords can be found in many types of workplaces, from offices and warehouses to retail stores and construction jobsites.

Unfortunately, they’re often commonly misused. Let’s go over some do’s and don’ts of extension cord safety from the Texas Department of Insurance Division of Workers’ Compensation.

Do:

  • Inspect an extension cord for physical damage before use.
  • Check that the cord matches the wattage rating on the appliance or tool you’re using.
  • Make sure all cords have been approved by an independent testing laboratory such as UL.
  • Fully insert the extension cord into the outlet.
  • Keep cords away from water.
  • Use ground-fault circuit interrupter protection when using extension cords in wet or damp environments.
  • Unplug extension cords when not in use.
  • Consider installing overhead pendants to reduce trip hazards.

Don’t:

  • Use an indoor extension cord outdoors.
  • Overload cords with more than the proper electrical load.
  • Run extension cords through doorways, holes in ceilings, walls or floors.
  • Daisy chain, or connect, multiple power strips together.
  • Move, bend or modify any of the extension cord plug’s metal parts.
  • Force a plug into an outlet.
  • Drive over an extension cord.
  • Attach extension cords to the wall with nails or staples.

McCraren Compliance offers many opportunities in safety training to help circumvent accidents. Please take a moment to visit our calendar of classes to see what we can do to help your safety measures from training to consulting.

Truck driver/equipment operator crushed while loading backhoe onto trailer

First published by Safety+Health an NSC publication
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Report number: 71-219-2022
Issued by: Washington State Fatality Assessment and Control Evaluation Program
Date of report: April 18, 2022

A 64-year-old truck driver and equipment operator working for a gravel-hauling and equipment-moving company drove his employer’s truck with an attached flatbed trailer to a jobsite. His task was to load a backhoe and transport it to another site. Although no one witnessed the incident, a backup warning alarm was sounding when first responders arrived, suggesting the driver was operating the backhoe in reverse. It’s possible the driver had started moving the backhoe up the trailer’s two metal ramps, then backed up to better position its wheels. As he was doing this, the wet, muddy tires may have slipped on the ramps, resulting in a rear wheel going off a ramp and causing the backhoe to roll over onto its side. The driver either attempted to jump from the operator’s seat or was thrown from it. He was crushed under the backhoe’s rollover protective structure and died. The backhoe had a seat belt that, if used, would have kept the driver in the seat and within the protective structure as the equipment rolled.

To help prevent similar occurrences, employers should:

  • Train equipment operators and ensure they always use a seat belt, including when loading and unloading onto a transport trailer.
  • Use a spotter to provide directions to the equipment operator during loading and unloading to ensure the operator positions equipment correctly for safe movement on and off the trailer.
  • Create a job hazard analysis for safely moving construction equipment.

McCraren Compliance offers many opportunities in safety training to help circumvent accidents. Please take a moment to visit our calendar of classes to see what we can do to help your safety measures from training to consulting.

FMCSA Declares Motor Carrier to be an Imminent Hazard to Public Safety

First published by FMCSA

WASHINGTON – The U.S. Department of Transportation Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) has declared Alvarez Transport LLC, USDOT No. 2484230, a motor carrier located in Orange, CT, to be an “imminent hazard” to public safety and ordered the motor carrier to immediately cease all interstate and intrastate operations.  The motor carrier was served the Federal order on June 23, 2022.

FMCSA’s imminent hazard order states that the basis for finding that Alvarez Transport, LLC, “pose[s] an imminent hazard to the public is [its] continued widespread noncompliance with Federal safety regulations including regulations in 49 CFR Part 382 (Controlled Substances and Alcohol Use and Testing), 49 CFR Part 383 (Commercial Driver’s License Standards; Requirements and Penalties), 49 CFR Part 391 (Qualifications of Drivers), and 49 CFR Part 396 (Vehicle Inspection, Repair, and Maintenance).”

During a Compliance Investigation that began on May 25, 2022, FMCSA safety investigators discovered extensive acute and/or critical violations in almost every part of the FMCSRs that they reviewed, including 49 CFR Parts 382, 383, 391, and 396. Cumulatively, these violations demonstrated the motor carrier’s lack of effective safety management controls and significantly increased the likelihood of death or serious injury if not discontinued immediately.

Moreover, while the Compliance Investigation was ongoing, on or about June 2, 2022, Alvarez Transport, LLC dispatched driver Dante C. Elliott to drive a commercial motor vehicle (CMV) for which a commercial driver’s license is required in interstate commerce from New Haven, CT to Williamstown, VT. At the time of dispatch, the motor carrier had in its records a copy of Mr. Elliott’s driver’s license that showed it was expired. While attempting to navigate a sharp curve on Vermont Route 64 in this CMV, Mr. Elliott left the traveled portion of the roadway, the CMV slid into a ditch, overturned, and then came to a position of uncontrolled rest on its roof. Both Mr. Elliott and his passenger were killed in the crash. Witnesses reported that the CMV’s brakes were smoking before the crash, and a post-crash inspection discovered several out-of-service vehicle conditions. Local law enforcement is still in the process of investigating this crash.

Failing to comply with the provisions of the Federal imminent hazard order may result in civil penalties of up to $29,893.  Knowing and/or willful violations may result in criminal penalties.


McCraren Compliance can help you understand and comply with FMCSA, USDOT and ADOT and ensure your drivers and your vehicles operate safely and efficiently.

Call us Today at 888-758-4757 or email us at info@mccrarencompliance.com to schedule your free FMCSA Compliance Assessment.

Hot weather means more “gators” showing up on Arizona’s highways

First published by ADOT

Since June 27-July 3 is “National Tire Safety Awareness Week(link is external),” an annual event sponsored by the U.S. Tire Manufacturers Association (USTMA), we thought ADOT could offer up some safety advice related to keeping an eye out for what many of us see out along our Arizona highways: pieces of tire debris.

Those shreds of treads have gained the nickname “gators” over the decades because many of them look like an alligator’s back floating on the water’s surface. While alligators are primarily limited to zoos in the Grand Canyon State, there are plenty of “gators” waiting for unsuspecting, or for that matter even suspecting, drivers along the state’s network of highways.

ADOT gets plenty of help from the Arizona Department of Public Safety and its troopers in responding to tire treads and also reminding drivers to stay alert to tire pieces and other debris that can wind up on highways. And without a doubt, there are things all of us as motorists can do to help reduce the risk of tire blowouts and the creation of Arizona gators.

Obviously, hotter summer weather can lead to more tire failures and debris, but it’s a year-round challenge. AZDPS troopers are kept busy tossing tire gators to a highway’s shoulder, possibly as they’re conducting traffic breaks (temporary stops of traffic) in order to clear debris.

ADOT’s team of Incident Response Unit, sponsored by State Farm, members and maintenance crews also respond to calls about debris. However, it’s impossible to catch everything immediately along more than 6,500 miles of state highways.

“We’re obviously very familiar with gators,” said Raul Amavisca, ADOT’s Central District engineering administrator. “We need all drivers to pay attention, keep their eyes on the road and be prepared for debris at any time. If you do that, you’ll increase your chances of being able to maneuver and avoid a tire tread and the damage it can cause.”

tire safety graphic

ADOT crews do spot pickups of roadside shoulder debris along busy Phoenix-area freeways throughout the year. The agency’s freeway shoulder sweeping contractors also maintain weekly schedules for collecting larger debris items along those shoulders in advance of their overnight street sweeping work.

As for things you can do about your own vehicle’s tires, here is some information from a USTMA news release about this year’s National Tire Safety Week: “U.S. tire manufacturers recommend drivers check tire pressure at least monthly, regularly check tire tread depth and ensure vehicle tires are rotated and properly aligned. Proper maintenance and periodic inspections by a tire professional are essential for optimum performance and service life of tires and can help ensure lower overall inspection impacts.

USTMA also offers the following safety advice: “To help motorists remember these important tire maintenance actions, USTMA encourages drivers to remember the acronym “P.A.R.T.” – Pressure, Alignment, Rotation and Tread. Tire safety essentials are especially important this year as significant numbers of motorists are back in their cars embarking on summer road trips.”

ADOT echoes the summer road trip safety recommendation, especially as we look ahead to the Fourth of July and Labor Day holiday weekends. Plan ahead, pack an emergency prep kit, check your vehicle for things such as tire pressure and condition. Don’t forget extra drinking water and other items that can help if an unscheduled stop in traffic occurs. Expect the unexpected, even if that includes a “gator.”


McCraren Compliance can help you understand and comply with FMCSA, USDOT and ADOT and ensure your drivers and your vehicles operate safely and efficiently.

Call us Today at 888-758-4757 or email us at info@mccrarencompliance.com to schedule your free FMCSA Compliance Assessment.

OSHA begins rulemaking process to revise standards for occupational exposure to lead

First published by OSHA

WASHINGTON – The U.S. Department of Labor announced that its Occupational Safety and Health Administration has published an Advance Notice of Proposed Rulemaking to revise its standards for occupational exposure to lead.

Recent medical research on workplace lead exposure shows adverse health effects can occur in adults at lower blood lead levels than recognized previously in the medical removal levels specified in OSHA’s lead standards.

The ANPRM seeks public input on modifying current OSHA lead standards for general industry and construction to reduce the triggers for medical removal protection and medical surveillance and prevent harmful health effects in workers exposed to lead more effectively.

OSHA asks the public to comment on the following areas of the lead standards:

  • Blood lead level triggers for medical removal protection.
  • Medical surveillance provisions, including triggers and frequency of blood lead monitoring.
  • Permissible exposure limit.
  • Ancillary provisions for personal protective equipment, housekeeping, hygiene and training.

The ANPRM will also gather comments on employers’ current practices that address workplace lead exposure and associated costs and other areas of interest.

Read the Federal Register notice for submission instructionsSubmit comments online by Aug. 29, 2022, on the federal e-Rulemaking portal and refer to Docket No. OSHA-2018-0004.


McCraren Compliance assists employers in protecting their workers, starting with a comprehensive Work-site Analysis, Hazard Prevention, Controls, and Safety & Health Training.

OSHA reminds fireworks/pyrotechnics industry to put worker safety first in advance of July 4 celebrations

First published by OSHA

WASHINGTON – As Independence Day approaches, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration urges employers in the fireworks and pyrotechnics industry to be vigilant and protect workers from hazards while manufacturing, storing, transporting, displaying and selling fireworks for public events.

In preparation for the July 4 holiday celebrations and firework displays, OSHA reminds employers to properly train workers and ensure appropriate measures are taken to prevent serious and fatal injuries.

OSHA’s web page on the pyrotechnics industry addresses retail sales of fireworks and fireworks displays. The page provides information on common hazards and solutions found in both areas of the industry, and downloadable safety posters for workplaces. It also includes a training video demonstrating best industry practices for retail sales and manufacturers based on National Fire Protection Association consensus standards.


McCraren Compliance offers many opportunities in safety training to help circumvent accidents. Please take a moment to visit our calendar of classes to see what we can do to help your safety measures from training to consulting.

FMCSA has Removed ArionT ELD from List of Registered ELDs

First published by FMCSA

FMCSA has removed the ArionT ELD Model AT5000 from its list of registered ELD devices. (Courtesy: FMCSA)

WASHINGTON – The U.S. Department of Transportation Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) has removed ArionT ELD from the list of registered Electronic Logging Devices (ELD). FMCSA has placed ArionT ELD on the Revoked Devices list due to the company’s failure to meet the minimum requirements established in 49 CFR part 395, subpart B, appendix A, effective June 24, 2022..

FMCSA will be sending an industry email to let motor carriers know that all who use ArionT ELD must take the following steps:

  1. Discontinue using the revoked device(s) and revert to paper logs or logging software to record required hours of service data.
  2. Replace the revoked device(s) with compliant ELD(s) from the Registered Devices list before August 24, 2022.

Motor carriers have a grace period of up to 60 days to replace the revoked device(s) with compliant ELD(s). If the ELD provider corrects all identified deficiencies, FMCSA will place the device back on the list of registered devices and inform the industry and the field.

During the grace period, safety officials are encouraged not to cite drivers using ArionT ELD for 395.8(a)(1) – “No ELD” or 395.22(a) – “Failed to use a registered ELD.” During this time, safety officials should request the driver’s paper logs, logging software, or use the ArionT ELD display as a back-up method to review the hours of service data.

Beginning August 24, 2022, motor carriers who continue to use the revoked device listed above would be considered to be operating without an ELD. Safety officials who encounter a driver using a revoked device on or after August 24, 2022 should cite 395.8(a)(1), and place the driver out-of-service in accordance with the CVSA OOS Criteria.

FMCSA strongly encourages motor carriers to take the actions listed above now to avoid compliance issues in the event that the deficiencies are not addressed in time.

For more information on ELDs, visit FMCSA’s ELD implementation website.


McCraren Compliance can help you understand and comply with FMCSA, USDOT and ADOT and ensure your drivers and your vehicles operate safely and efficiently.

Call us Today at 888-758-4757 or email us at info@mccrarencompliance.com to schedule your free FMCSA Compliance Assessment.

Brake Safety Week Is Aug. 21-27

First published by CVSA

Photo: Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance

The Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance (CVSA) has announced Aug. 21-27 as the dates for this year’s Brake Safety Week. Brake Safety Week is an annual commercial motor vehicle brake-safety inspection, enforcement and education initiative conducted by law enforcement jurisdictions in Canada, Mexico and the U.S. During Brake Safety Week, inspectors will conduct their usual  and capture and report brake-related data to CVSA. The results will be released in the fall.

Brake-related violations comprise the largest percentage of all out-of-service vehicle violations cited during roadside inspections, and according to last year’s three-day International Roadcheck data, brake systems and brake adjustment violations accounted for 38.9% of all vehicle out-of-service violations, the most of any category of vehicle violations. To address this, CVSA’s Brake Safety Week seeks to:

  • Identify and remove commercial motor vehicles with critical vehicle inspection violation items identified in the  from roadways.
  • Conduct inspections and identify and acknowledge commercial motor vehicles that do not have critical vehicle inspection violations by affixing those vehicles with a CVSA decal.
  • Encourage proactive vehicle maintenance in advance of the week.
  • Highlight the hard work and commitment to safety by inspectors, drivers and motor carriers.
  • Remind drivers and motor carriers about the importance of proper brake maintenance and vehicle pre-trip and post-trip inspections.
  • Provide an opportunity for outreach and educational brake-safety efforts by inspectors.

During the brake portion of a , inspectors will look for missing, non-functioning, loose, contaminated or cracked parts on the brake system, and non-manufactured holes (such as rust holes and holes created by rubbing or friction) and broken springs in the spring brake housing section of the parking brake. They will listen for audible air leaks around brake components and lines, and ensure the air system maintains air pressure between 90-100 psi (620-690 kPa). Inspectors will also check for S-cam flip-over and measure pushrod travel. They will check that slack adjusters are the same length (from center of S-cam to center of clevis pin) and the air chambers on each axle are the same size. They will also inspect required brake-system warning devices, such as ABS malfunction lamp(s) and low air-pressure warning devices. In addition, inspectors will ensure the breakaway system is operable on the trailer, and inspect the tractor protection system, including the bleed-back system on the trailer.

In addition to reporting total inspections and brake-related out-of-service violations, inspectors will also capture and provide data on brake hose/tubing chafing violations – the  for this year’s Brake Safety Week.

“Poorly maintained brake systems can reduce the braking capacity and stopping distance of large trucks and motorcoaches, which poses a serious risk to driver and public safety,” said CVSA President Capt. John Broers with the South Dakota Highway Patrol. “In those split-second emergency situations, the proper functionality of the brake systems on large commercial motor vehicles is crucial.”


McCraren Compliance can help you understand and comply with FMCSA, USDOT and ADOT and ensure your drivers and your vehicles operate safely and efficiently.

Call us Today at 888-758-4757 or email us at info@mccrarencompliance.com to schedule your free FMCSA Compliance Assessment.

MSHA – Mine Fatality #13

First published by MSHA

MINE FATALITY – On June 17, 2022, a contract miner died when the compactor he was operating overturned, pinning him beneath the cab.  As the miner was backing up, the left tire went off the edge of a four-foot embankment, causing the compactor to overturn.

Aciident scene where a contract miner died when the compactor he was operating overturned, pinning him beneath the cab. 
Photo property of MSHA
Best Practices: 
  • Wear seat belts at all times when operating equipment.
  • Train miners to perform tasks safely, and to recognize potential hazards.
Additional Information:

This is the 13th fatality reported in 2022, and the 4th classified as “Machinery.”


McCraren Compliance offers many opportunities in safety training to help circumvent accidents. Please take a moment to visit our calendar of classes to see what we can do to help your safety measures from training to consulting.

MSHA Offering $1M in Safety Grants

First published by MSHA

WASHINGTON – The U.S. Department of Labor today announced a funding availability of up to $1 million in grants through its Brookwood-Sago grant program to support education and training to help the mining community identify, avoid and prevent unsafe and unhealthy working conditions in and around the nation’s mines.

Established by the Mine Improvement and New Emergency Response Act of 2006, the program’s efforts to make mines safer and healthier honors 25 miners who perished in disasters at the Jim Walter Resources #5 mine in Brookwood, Alabama, in 2001 and at the Sago Mine in Buckhannon, West Virginia, in 2006.

Administered by the department’s Mine Safety and Health Administration, the Brookwood-Sago grants will focus education and training programs on occupational hazards, including:

  • Exposures to respirable dust and crystalline silica.
  • Powered haulage and mobile equipment safety.
  • Mine emergency preparedness and rescue.
  • Electrical safety.
  • Contract and customer truck drivers.
  • Improving training for new and inexperienced miners, and managers and supervisors performing mining tasks.
  • Pillar safety for underground mines.
  • Falls from heights.

The grants may also support programs emphasizing training on miners’ statutory rights, including the right to a safe and healthy working environment, to refuse an unsafe task, and to have a voice in the safety and health conditions at the mine. Recipients may use the grant funding to develop educational and training materials, recruit mine operators and miners for the training, and to conduct and evaluate training.

In awarding the grants, MSHA will give special emphasis to education and training programs that target miners at smaller mines and underserved populations in the mining industry. They will also prioritize diversity, equity and inclusion.

Learn more or submit a grant application. The closing date for applications is Aug. 23, 2022. MSHA will award grants on or before Sept. 30, 2022. Learn more about MSHA.


McCraren Compliance assists employers in protecting their workers, starting with a comprehensive Work-site Analysis, Hazard Prevention, Controls, and Safety & Health Training.

Please contact us today at 888-758-4757 to learn how we can provide mine safety training and consulting for your business.