Blog

Suicide in the Construction Industry: Breaking the Stigma and Silence

A suicide occurs every 12 minutes in the U.S. While these incidents touch every industry, one industry in particular has felt the impact of suicide in recent years – construction and extraction. A CDC study found that in 2012 and 2015, suicide rates were highest among males in the construction and extraction occupational group. Continue reading»

IBOEHS – Quarterly Newsletter

For   Their   Safety

Apr – May – Jun  2019    Volume 17, Issue 2

International Board of Environmental Health & Safety “Instilling Professionalism

  • Carelessness
  • Protecting Your Sight
  • Using Portable Generators Safely
  • Disease Dangers of Flood Waters
  • Afterthoughts and Regrets

Carelessness

 PATHS (PA Training for Health & Safety)

Have you ever done anything that wasn’t really smart? Something that you know put you at increased risk of injury? When you realized what you did, whether you were hurt or not, did you ask yourself, “Why did I ever do that?” For your own self-preservation, this should be a very important question for you to answer yourself.

Consider the fact that approximately 20 percent of injuries are due to unsafe conditions and 80 percent are caused by unsafe acts. If you realize that most unsafe conditions are brought about by human failure, then virtually all accidents/mishaps are brought about by unsafe acts. Why did you do something in an unsafe manner? To answer this question, you will need to put personal defenses aside and know that blame may lie within yourself. Also realize that there may be more than one reason for your actions and others may be involved. Continue reading»

 

Free Toolkit for Distracted Driving Awareness Month

April is distracted driving awareness month. This year, to help tackle this pervasive problem, we’ve added a focus on cyclist safety by creating two new toolbox talks to go along with several other free driving resources, available here: https://safestart.com/driving-awareness-toolkit/ Please use these to help your workers stay safe on the road.

Hudbay Receives the Mine Plan of Operations for Rosemont

March 21, 2019

Hudbay Minerals said Thursday that it has received the approved Mine Plan of Operations for the proposed Rosemont mine project, the final step in the permitting process.

“Rosemont is now a fully permitted, shovel-ready copper project and we look forward to developing this world-class asset,” said Alan Hair, Hudbay’s president and chief executive officer, in a press release.

The MPO was received from the U.S. Forest Service about two weeks after the project received the Section 404 Water Permit. READ MORE

MSHA MINE FATALITY #5

On Thursday, March 7, 2019, a 38-year-old miner with 10 years of mining experience received fatal injuries while he was working on the pad of a highwall mining machine (HWM).  The miner was contacted in a pinch point between a post and a section of the HWM (i.e. push beam) that was being removed as part of the normal mining cycle.

Fatality #5 Accident Scene
Best Practices:
  • Establish and discuss safe work procedures for removing push beams.  Identify and control all hazards and develop methods to protect miners.
  • Determine the proper working position to avoid pinch points.  Monitor personnel to ensure safe work procedures are followed.
  • Always follow the equipment manufacturer’s recommended maintenance procedures and discuss these procedures during training.
  • Train miners to recognize potential hazardous conditions and understand safe job procedures before beginning work.

MSHA MINE FATALITY #4

On March 7, 2019, a 46-year-contractor with three years of experience was fatally injured when he lost his balance and fell backwards through a narrow gap between two log washers and landed on a cable tray approximately 12 feet below.  The victim was changing drive belts on a log washer motor when his wrench slipped off of a bolt he was tightening, causing the loss of balance.

Best Practices:
  • Always use fall protection equipment, safety belts and lines, when working at heights and near openings where there is a danger of falling.
  • Always be aware of your surroundings and any hazards that may be present.
  • Have properly designed handrails, guards, and covers securely in place at openings through which persons may fall.
  • Train personnel in safe work procedures regarding the use of handrails and fall protection equipment during maintenance and construction activities and ensure their use.
  • Conduct workplace examinations in order to identify and correct hazards prior to performing work.