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Carbon monoxide: The silent killer

First published by Safety+Health an NSC publication
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Do your employees use gas-powered equipment at work? If so, they may be exposed to carbon monoxide.

Carbon monoxide is a colorless, odorless gas that can deprive an exposed worker’s brain, heart and other vital organs of oxygen. Symptoms of mild exposure include nausea, dizziness and headache. High exposure can result in confusion, loss of consciousness, muscle weakness and more.

Protect your workers from carbon monoxide poisoning. Oregon OSHA has tips to help.

  • Survey your workplace to identify potential sources of exposure.
  • Educate workers about the dangers of carbon monoxide poisoning.
  • Know the sources: Besides gasoline, natural gas, oil, propane, coal and wood can produce carbon monoxide.
  • Keep internal-combustion equipment in good operating condition.
  • Don’t use or operate fuel-powered engines or tools inside buildings or in partially enclosed areas.
  • Regularly test the air in poorly ventilated areas. Use mechanical ventilation when possible to keep carbon monoxide below unsafe exposure levels.
  • Use personal CO monitors where potential sources of carbon monoxide exist, Oregon OSHA says. “These monitors should be equipped with audible alarms to warn workers when CO concentrations are too high.”

McCraren Compliance offers many opportunities in safety training to help circumvent accidents. Please take a moment to visit our calendar of classes to see what we can do to help your safety measures from training to consulting.

Labor Rights Week set for Aug. 31-Sept. 3

First published by DOL

En español

Collage showing immigrant workers in different occupations with the text "Labor Rights Week, August 30 to September 3. dol.gov/LaborRightsWeek"

Every day, millions of vulnerable workers head to jobs where they unnecessarily face dangerous or unfair conditions. Construction workers aren’t given necessary personal protective equipment and suffer injuries or fatalities as a result. Dishwashers are told to work overtime without pay. Garment workers are paid for each piece they sew – but those wages are less than the federal minimum wage.

Some aren’t aware of their rights because their employers failed to provide that information in a language they understand. Some are afraid to speak up for fear of losing their jobs or being deported.

During Labor Rights Week, Aug. 30 – Sept. 3, we’re getting the word out that ALL workers have the same right to a safe workplace and fair pay, as well as the right to report possible violations without retaliation. That’s because worker protections apply to everyone regardless of immigration status.

The U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health AdministrationWage and Hour Division and Bureau of International Labor Affairs are teaming up with federal and state agencies, embassies and worker advocates to deliver that message to those who need to hear it most.

Many immigrant workers have performed essential duties throughout the COVID-19 pandemic. It is important that they have meaningful access to information about their rights as they work diligently during these challenging times. It’s also important that employers understand their responsibilities and meet their obligations. We are committed to working together through education and compliance assistance.

Explore our resources, available in many languages, and learn more about how you can get involved at dol.gov/LaborRightsWeek.


McCraren Compliance offers many opportunities in safety training to help circumvent accidents. Please take a moment to visit our calendar of classes to see what we can do to help your safety measures from training to consulting.

Respiratory Protection Week set for Sept. 7-10

First published by Safety+Health an NSC publication
respiratory_protection_week.jpeg
Photo: NIOSH

 NIOSH’s National Personal Protective Technology Laboratory has marked Sept. 7-10 as its annual Respiratory Protection Week, an event intended to promote proper respiratory protection practices through the sharing of related research findings and educational tools.

In 2019, NIOSH expanded N95 Day, which had been observed since 2012, into Respiratory Protection Week.

As organizations continue to navigate the COVID-19 pandemic, NIOSH says it has remained focused on developing information products to address frequently asked questions related to respiratory protection and personal protective equipment.

“This extraordinary time emphasizes the importance of respiratory protection and PPE,” NPPTL Director Maryann D’Alessandro said in a press release. “We are excited to spread awareness on this topic, spotlight our valuable resources and provide insight into our vision regarding the future of PPE.”

NIOSH is set to host separate one-hour webinars:

For more information, follow updates from @NIOSH_NPPTL on Twitter.


McCraren Compliance offers many opportunities in safety training to help circumvent accidents. Please take a moment to visit our calendar of classes to see what we can do to help your safety measures from training to consulting.

OSHA announces stand-down on preventing construction worker suicides

First published by Safety+Health an NSC publication

Image from CPWR

OSHA is urging employers in the construction industry to take part in a weeklong safety stand-down to raise awareness about suicide prevention.

Slated for Sept. 6-10, the Suicide Prevention Safety Stand-Down coincides with National Suicide Prevention Month. A Centers for Disease Control and Prevention study published last year concluded that male construction workers have one of the highest suicide rates when compared with other industries and are at four times greater risk than the general public.

“Work-related stress can have severe impacts on mental health and, without proper support, may lead to substance abuse and even suicide,” Acting Assistant Secretary of Labor for Occupational Safety and Health Jim Frederick said in the release. “Workers in construction face many work-related stressors that may increase their risk factors for suicide, such as the uncertainty of seasonal work, demanding schedules and workplace injuries that are sometimes treated with opioids.”

An OSHA press release highlights a number of the agency’s resources that employers can use during the weeklong event, as well as others produced by construction industry groups. The agency has assembled a task force to help raise awareness on the types of stress that construction workers may face.

OSHA’s regional offices in Kansas City and St. Louis initiated the first stand-down last year in partnership with The Builders’ Association, the Associated General Contractors of Missouri, the University of Iowa, Washington University, the University of Kansas, the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention, local worker unions and several employers. The event included more than 5,000 participants, the release states.

                                                       

McCraren Compliance offers many opportunities in safety training to help circumvent accidents. Please take a moment to visit our calendar of classes to see what we can do to help your safety measures from training to consulting.

It’s Brake Safety Week

First published by CVSA

Commerical Vehicle Safety Alliance - McCraren Compliance

Photo property of CVSA

Starting today, Aug. 22, through Aug. 28, commercial motor vehicle law enforcement personnel in Canada, Mexico and the U.S. will be cataloging and submitting brake inspection and violation data to the Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance (CVSA) for Brake Safety Week, a vehicle safety initiative focused on the inspection and identification of brake violations in commercial motor vehicles. The results will be released later in the year and will include the brake-related out-of-service rates for the week, along with data on chafing air brake hose/tubing violations, the focus area for this year’s Brake Safety Week.

“Although inspection of a vehicle’s brake system and its components is always part of the roadside inspection process, Brake Safety Week aims to highlight the importance of brake systems and proper brake maintenance, operation and performance,” said CVSA President Sgt. John Samis with the Delaware State Police.

Throughout Brake Safety Week, CVSA-certified inspectors will be conducting North American Standard Level I and V Inspections. When checking the brake system and its components, the inspector will:

  • Check for missing, non-functioning, loose, contaminated or cracked parts on the brake system.
  • Check for S-cam flip-over.
  • Listen for audible air leaks around brake components and lines.
  • Check for improper connections and chafing of air hoses and tubing.
  • Ensure slack adjusters are the same length (from center of S-cam to center of clevis pin) and the air chambers on each axle are the same size.
  • Ensure the air system maintains proper air pressure.
  • Look for non-manufactured holes (e.g., rust holes, holes created by rubbing or friction, etc.) and broken springs in the spring brake housing.
  • Mark and measure pushrod travel.
  • Inspect required brake system warning devices, such as anti-lock braking system malfunction lamp(s) and low air-pressure warning devices.
  • Inspect the tractor protection system, including the bleed-back system on the trailer.
  • Ensure the breakaway system is operable on the trailer.

In addition to checking brake systems, inspectors may also check cargo securement, coupling devices, driveline/driveshaft components, driver’s seat (missing), exhaust systems, frames, fuel systems, lighting devices, steering mechanisms, suspensions, tires, van and open-top trailer bodies, wheels, rims and hubs, windshield wipers, etc.

If no critical vehicle inspection item violations are found during a Level I or V Inspection, that vehicle is eligible for a CVSA decal. Conversely, vehicles with critical vehicle inspection item violations may be placed out of service if they meet the North American Standard Out-of-Service Criteria. Those violations must be addressed before the vehicle will be permitted to proceed.

Brake Safety Week is a campaign of CVSA’s Operation Airbrake program, supported by CVSA member jurisdictions, the U.S. Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration, the Canadian Council of Motor Transport Administrators, and Mexico’s Ministry of Communications and Transportation and the National Guard.

View the results from last year’s Brake Safety Week.


McCraren Compliance can help you understand and comply with FMCSA, DOT and ADOT and ensure your drivers and your vehicles operate safely and efficiently.

Call us Today at 888-758-4757 or email us at info@mccrarencompliance.com to schedule your free FMCSA Compliance Assessment.

FMCSA to medical examiners: Submit driver exams conducted when registry was offline

First published by Safety+Health an NSC publication

Washington — The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration has set a deadline of Sept. 30 for certified medical examiners to submit the results of physical qualification exams of commercial truck and bus drivers that were completed while the National Registry of Certified Medical Examiners was offline from Dec. 1, 2017, through Aug. 13, 2018.

According to a notice published in the Aug. 9 Federal Register, “a significant number of health care professionals” – estimated at around 14,000 – haven’t uploaded results of exams conducted during the 36-week window in which the national registry website wasn’t accessible after a hacking attempt.

“FMCSA makes this request to ensure, to the greatest extent possible, that results of all examinations conducted during the outage are reported to the national registry,” the notice states. In an audit published in January, the Department of Transportation Office of Inspector General estimates that 780,000 or so exams may be outstanding from the database.

FMCSA announced in April 2018 that the attempted hack was unsuccessful and no personal information was exposed. After the incident, the agency says it advised medical examiners to “segregate all examinations completed during the outage and be prepared to upload them to the national registry system when it is back online and operating normally.”

According to the notice, the database’s reporting functionality for medical examiners was restored on June 22, 2018, while administrative assistants and third-party organizations were able to again submit results on behalf of medical examiners on Aug. 13, 2018. However, FMCSA didn’t require immediate uploads amid initial concerns of accelerated activity on the temporary national registry system. “Continued improvements” to the system have helped alleviate the concerns, the notice states.

The national registry website notes that FMCSA is developing a new database “to better serve you.”


McCraren Compliance can help you understand and comply with FMCSA, DOT and ADOT and ensure your drivers and your vehicles operate safely and efficiently.

Call us Today at 888-758-4757 or email us at info@mccrarencompliance.com to schedule your free FMCSA Compliance Assessment.

Stay Out – Stay Alive

First published by MSHA
MSHA Stay Out Stay Alive Logo for 2021

Photo property of MSHA.gov

Stay Out, Stay Alive 

Exploring or playing at active and abandoned mine sites is dangerous, potentially fatal 

Water-filled quarries and pits hide rock ledges, old machinery and other hazards.  The water can be deceptively deep and dangerously cold.  Steep, slippery walls make exiting the water difficult.  Hills of loose material can easily collapse on an unsuspecting biker or climber.  Vertical shafts can be hundreds of feet deep and may be completely unprotected, or hidden by vegetation.

Even so dozens of people are injured or killed while exploring or playing on mine property every year.  The men and women employed in our nation’s mines are trained to work in a safe manner.  For trespassers, hazards are not always apparent.

For example:

  • Water-filled quarries can not only hide rock ledges but can also contain dangerous electric currents that become deadly under water.
  • Abandoned mine shafts that may seem fun to explore can unexpectedly collapse.

As students return to school while the weather is still warm and water seems inviting, it is more important than ever to remind people to stay out of abandoned or active mine sites like quarries and pits – and stay alive.

Visit https://www.abandonedmines.gov/staying-safe to learn more about abandoned mine and quarry accidents. Please help us raise awareness about this summertime danger. Most importantly, remind people to Stay Out, Stay Alive!


McCraren Compliance offers many opportunities in safety training to help circumvent accidents. Please take a moment to visit our calendar of classes to see what we can do to help your safety measures from training to consulting.

MSHA – Mine Fatality #23

First published by MSHA

MINE FATALITY – On August 3, 2021, a miner was run over by a customer tractor-trailer while walking to his normal work area.

Accident scene where a miner drowned during a flash flood while traveling in a personnel carrier to go to the mine portal.
Photo property of MSHA.gov
Best Practices:
  • Assure adequate illumination sufficient to provide safe working conditions.
  • Communicate with mobile equipment operators and make eye contact to ensure they acknowledge your presence. Be aware of the location and traffic patterns of mobile equipment in your work area.
  • Wear high visibility clothing when working around mobile equipment.
  • Wear strobe lights near mobile equipment.
  • Assure traffic controls provide for safe movement of mobile equipment and are followed. Operate mobile equipment at reduced speeds in work areas.
  • Stay clear of normal paths of travel for mobile equipment and train all persons to recognize work place hazards.
Additional Information:

This is the 23rd fatality reported in 2021, and the ninth classified as “Powered Haulage.”


McCraren Compliance offers many opportunities in safety training to help circumvent accidents. Please take a moment to visit our calendar of classes to see what we can do to help your safety measures from training to consulting.

OSHA issues updated guidance on COVID-19

First published by OSHA

U.S. Department of Labor issues updated guidance on protecting
unvaccinated and other at-risk workers from the coronavirus

WASHINGTON, DC – The U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration today issued updated guidance to help employers protect workers from the coronavirus. The updated guidance reflects developments in science and data, including the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s updated COVID-19 guidance issued July 27.

The updated guidance expands information on appropriate measures for protecting workers in higher-risk workplaces with mixed-vaccination status workers, particularly for industries such as manufacturing; meat, seafood and poultry processing; high volume retail and grocery; and agricultural processing, where there is often prolonged close contact with other workers and/or non-workers.

OSHA’s latest guidance:

  • Recommends that fully vaccinated workers in areas of substantial or high community transmission wear masks in order to protect unvaccinated workers;
  • Recommends that fully vaccinated workers who have close contacts with people with coronavirus wear masks for up to 14 days unless they have a negative coronavirus test at least 3-5 days after such contact;
  • Clarifies recommendations to protect unvaccinated workers and other at-risk workers in manufacturing, meat and poultry processing, seafood processing and agricultural processing; and
  • Links to the latest guidance on K-12 schools and CDC statements on public transit.

OSHA continues to emphasize that vaccination is the optimal step to protect workers and encourages employers to engage with workers and their representatives to implement multi-layered approaches to protect unvaccinated or otherwise at-risk workers from the coronavirus.

As part of the agency’s ongoing commitment to review the COVID-19 Healthcare Emergency Temporary Standard every 30-days, OSHA also said that the safeguards set forth by the standard remain more important than ever. After reviewing the latest guidance, science and data, and consulting with the CDC and partners, OSHA has determined the requirements of the healthcare ETS remain necessary to address the grave danger of the coronavirus in healthcare. OSHA will continue to monitor and assess the need for changes in the healthcare ETS each month.

Our priority is the safety and health of workers, and we will continue to enforce the law to ensure workers are protected from the virus while they are on the job, including through OSHA’s National Emphasis Program on COVID.


McCraren Compliance offers many opportunities in safety training to help circumvent accidents. Please take a moment to visit our calendar of classes to see what we can do to help your safety measures from training to consulting.

New DOT Drug Testing CCF Form Required

First published by DOT

The Revised Federal Drug Testing Custody and Control Form

must be used beginning August 30th, 2021[1]

Important Dates

We will conform to the dates HHS has instructed its certified laboratories to use as follows:

August 29, 2021 – Last date to use the ‘old CCF’.

August 30, 2021 – The date you must use the ‘revised CCF’.  If you use the ‘old CCF’, you must complete a Memorandum for the Record (MFR), otherwise the test will be canceled.

What happened?

On August 17, 2020, the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) approved a revised Federal Drug Testing Custody and Control Form (CCF).  In addition, OMB authorized the use of the old form through August 29, 2021.  You can view the revised CCF here.

When using the ‘old CCF’ from September 1, 2020 through August 29, 2021, a MFR is not required.

Most of the changes adopted in the revised CCF were made to accommodate the use of oral fluid specimens for the Federal drug testing program.  Oral fluid drug testing is not authorized in DOT’s drug testing program.

What’s happening now?

As of August 30, 2021, DOT-regulated employers and their service agents [collectors, laboratories, Medical Review Officers] must use the ‘revised CCF’.

Where can an employer or a collector obtain the revised CCF?

Contact your Department of Health and Human Services (HHS)-certified laboratory to obtain the revised CCF.  A list of HHS‑certified laboratories can be found here.

As an employer or collector, what should I be doing now?

As an employer or collector, monitor your existing supply of ‘old CCFs’ and coordinate the delivery of the ‘revised CCF’ with your HHS-certified laboratory.  Some laboratories may have already contacted you or provided you with information about the delivery of the ‘revised CCF’.

[1] This guidance does not have the force and effect of law and is not meant to bind the public in any way. This guidance is intended only to provide clarity to the public regarding existing requirements under the law.

Last updated: Tuesday, August 10, 2021


McCraren Compliance can help you understand and comply with FMCSA, DOT and ADOT and ensure your drivers and your vehicles operate safely and efficiently.

Call us Today at 888-758-4757 or email us at info@mccrarencompliance.com to schedule your free FMCSA Compliance Assessment.