Survey shows millennials want more wellness resources

Nearly 4 out of 5 millennial workers say their employers should do more to support their health and well-being, including making resources more readily available, according to the findings of a recent survey.

National polling firm Ipsos Public Affairs, on behalf of Welltok – an employee health and well-being software provider – surveyed more than 1,000 full-time workers, of whom 330 were millennials (age 21-34), in December 2018.

Results show that 78% of the millennial workers said companywide health and well-being initiatives are falling short.

Other findings:

  • 44% of the millennial workers said occupational stress is negatively impacting their lives.
  • 51% have seriously considered changing their work situation because of stress.
  • Among the support resources millennial workers want most, emotional health (75%) led the way, followed by financial (73%), physical (70%) and social health (64%).

In an Aug. 8 press release, Welltok recommends that, in addition to making resources more easily available, employers should use incentives to motivate millennial workers to participate in wellness programs. Among the top rewards the millennials said they would be motivated by are extra vacation time (64%), wellness benefits such as gym memberships (56%) and flexible work schedules (53%).

Sleep deprivation among U.S. workers a growing problem, study finds

More than 1 out of 3 U.S. working adults aren’t getting enough sleep, and the prevalence of sleep deprivation has increased significantly since 2010, according to researchers from Ball State University.

The researchers analyzed 2010-2018 data from more than 150,000 working adults who participated in the National Health Interview Survey to determine the frequency of short sleep duration. Of the respondents, 35.6% reported getting less than seven hours of sleep a night in 2018. That’s up from 30.9% in 2010.

“Inadequate sleep is associated with mild to severe physical and mental health problems, injury, loss of productivity, and premature mortality,” Jagdish Khubchandani, lead study author and a health science professor at BSU, said in a press release. “This is a significant finding because the U.S. is currently witnessing high rates of chronic diseases across all ages, and many of these diseases are related to sleep problems.”

Other findings:

  • Professions with the highest prevalence of sleep deprivation in 2018 were police and military (50%), health care support (45%), transport and material moving (41%), and production occupations (41%).
  • Among women, 38.8% reported less than seven hours of sleep a night, up from 31.2% in 2010. Among men, those percentages were 35.5 and 30.5, respectively.
  • Among racial groups, sleep deficiency prevalence rose among African Americans (40.6% to 46.5%), Asian Americans (29.5% to 35.3%) and whites (29.2% to 34.1%).

The National Sleep Foundation recommends adults sleep seven to nine hours a night.

“Employers have a major responsibility and should use health promotion strategies to ensure that workers who struggle with sleep problems are assisted,” Khubchandani said. “We all suffer when our bus and truck drivers, doctors, and nurses are sleep deprived. There is a need for increasing awareness and improving the diagnosis and treatment of sleep disorders, and there needs to be emphasis on public education, training for health professionals and monitoring.”

Senate Confirms Scalia as Secretary of Labor

The Senate has confirmed Eugene Scalia to lead the Labor Department, replacing Alexander Acosta who resigned amid questions over a plea deal he brokered for the now-deceased sex offender Jeffrey Epstein.

The Senate voted along party lines, 53-44, to confirm Scalia. He is the son of the late Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia.

At his confirmation hearing last week, Democrats questioned his record on LGBTQ and disability rights, noting his past writings and court cases. The Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee on Tuesday voted along party lines to advance his nomination.

President Trump officially nominated Scalia in August, triggering opposition from labor unions due to his work as a lawyer for businesses in high-profile labor fights.

Scalia, 55, is a partner at the law firm Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher and is a member and former co-chairman of its labor and employment practice group. He also co-chairs the firm’s administrative law and regulatory practice group.

He also served as solicitor of the Labor Department from 2002 to 2003 after his appointment by former President George W. Bush.

Workplaces most common public site of mass attacks, Secret Service report show

Photo: Bim/iStockphoto

Washington — Building on research in its initial report issued last year, the Secret Service’s National Threat Assessment Center has released its second Mass Attacks in Public Spaces report.

The latest report – published July 9 – examines 27 incidents in 18 states in 2018. In each incident, three or more people were harmed in public spaces. Most occurred in workplaces (20), followed by open spaces (four) – such as a public sidewalk, street or parking lot – and high schools (three).

As it noted in the first report, NTAC again found that attackers were most often “motivated by a personal grievance related to a workplace, domestic or other issue.” They also had experienced at least one significant stressor, most notably financial instability. Read more»

Older workers’ health: Finding the right job fit matters, researchers say

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Photo: Stígur Már Karlsson/Heimsmyndir/iStockphoto

Houston — For older workers, the right job fit can benefit overall health and well-being, while a poor fit is more likely to push them into retirement, according to researchers from Rice University and Colorado State University.  Read more»

Arizona Geological Survey’s (AZGS) annual impact on Arizona’s economy

A new economic impact report shows that the products and services of the Arizona Geological Survey (UA AZGS) contributed nearly $32 million to Arizona’s economy over the past year – a 34-fold return on the survey’s FY-2018 state allocation of $941,000.
In Spring 2019, AZGS contracted with the Univ. of Arizona’s Eller School of Management graduate program to assess the annual contribution of our geologic products and services to Arizona’s economy. The results are in!

For more details, click here for today’s Arizona Geology blog post.