Poor sleep patterns raise risks of metabolic disorders

Photo: Drazen Zigic/iStockphoto

Bethesda, MD — Irregular sleep patterns do more than just make you tired at work – they can have long-lasting adverse effects on your health.

According to a study conducted by researchers at Boston’s Brigham and Women’s Hospital, for every hour of variability in your bedtime and time asleep, you could face up to a 27% higher risk of metabolic syndrome, which the National Institutes of Health defines as “a group of risk factors that raises your risk for heart disease and other health problems, such as diabetes and stroke.”

Read more

Inactivity on the increase among Americans of all ages, researchers say

Photo: TARIK KIZILKAYA/iStockphoto

St. Louis — Despite hearing the warnings about the health hazards of prolonged sitting – including greater risk of obesity, diabetes, heart disease and certain cancers – most Americans aren’t taking heed.

Using data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, researchers from the School of Medicine at Washington University in St. Louis examined a “nationally representative sample” of more than 51,000 Americans across various ages, races and ethnic groups over a 16-year period (2001-2016).

The researchers found that daily sitting time among teens increased to just over eight hours a day in 2016 from seven in 2007. Among adults, sitting time rose to nearly 6.5 hours a day from 5.5 in the same time period.

Results also showed that most Americans spend at least two hours a day watching TV or videos. Among children ages 5-11, 62% spent at least two hours in front of screens. That number was 59% for ages 12-19, 65% for ages 20-64 and rose to 84% for adults 65 and older.

In the two most recent years of the study, at least half of people in all age groups used a computer for at least an hour of leisure time. Up to 25% of all ages used a computer for at least three hours a day when away from work or school.

“In almost none of the groups we analyzed are the numbers going in the right direction,” senior author Yin Cao, an epidemiologist and assistant professor of surgery at Washington University, said in an April 23 press release.

The study was published April 23 in the Journal of the American Medical Association

 

Study explores which generation of workers is most likely to consider suicide

Dallas — Millennial workers are more likely to contemplate suicide than any other age group – including up to five times more so than baby boomers – results of a recent analysis indicate.

Researchers at Catapult Health, a national preventive health care provider, looked at more than 157,000 patient records, including data from checkups conducted by the company at workplaces across 44 states.

They found that, of the patients younger than 30, 2.3 per 1,000 reported not only considering suicide, but also having a plan to carry it out. For workers 60 and older, that rate was 0.4 per 1,000 and, across all age groups, the average was 0.86.

“The numbers may seem small,” Catapult CEO David Michel said in a May 1 press release, “but if your company has 5,000 employees, that means that at any given moment four of them are probably seriously considering suicide, and the number is higher if you employ more younger workers.”

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, suicide is the second leading cause of death among millennials and the 10th leading cause of death in the United States.

In addition, workers younger than 30 are significantly more likely to experience depression than older employees, Catapult states.

“It is imperative that employers help their employees recognize depression and provide the resources to overcome it,” Michel said in the release.

FMCSA Updates SMS Website

FMCSA has updated the CSA SMS Website with the May 31, 2019 results.

Complete SMS results are available to enforcement users and motor carriers that are logged into the SMS. Logged-in enforcement users can view all carrier safety data, while logged-in motor carriers can only view their own data. If you are a motor carrier and do not have login credentials, please click here for more information on how to obtain your PIN.

 

FMCSA Updates Drug and Alcohol Clearinghouse Website

Beginning January 6, 2020, all employers subject to FMCSA’s Drug and Alcohol Program requirements will be required to report and query drug and alcohol violation information in the forthcoming Commercial Driver’s License Drug and Alcohol Clearinghouse (Clearinghouse). Recently, FMCSA enhanced the Clearinghouse website with news and resources designed to help motor carriers and other users prepare for their role in the Clearinghouse. Updates include a new User Roles card, which summarizes the actions different types of users will take in the Clearinghouse, an interactive timeline, and additional frequently asked questions. Visit https://clearinghouse.fmcsa.dot.gov to learn more and to sign up to receive email notifications when more information is available.

sms_crop