3M gives update on recent recall of fall protection devices

Red Wing, MN — 3M Co. has resolved an issue with the energy absorber on one of its recalled fall protection devices, the organization announced Aug. 6. The solution, however, is available only in regions that recognize ANSI standard Z359.14.

3M recently issued an immediate recall and stop-use alert for the DBI-SALA Twin-Leg Nano-Lok Edge and Wrap Back Twin-Leg Self-Retracting Lifelines. The energy absorbers on both devices were susceptible to not deploying in a proper manner, potentially putting workers at risk of serious injury or death, the alert states.

3M announced that it resolved the partial deployment of the energy absorber on its DBI-SALA Twin-Leg Nano-Lok Edge device, but that solution is limited so far.

“Due to regional regulatory requirements, this solution is currently available ONLY in regions that recognize the ANSI standard,” 3M states. “As other regulatory certifications are received, this solution will be made available in those regions. Until your unit has been repaired or replaced, the ‘Stop Use and Recall’ remains in effect and these units must be removed from service.”

The alert informs customers that the fall protection device is safe to use if it has a green check mark on the front label, adding that the mark means the unit “has either been repaired or has come from the factory with the revision and is certified for its intended use.”

3M is offering to repair or replace affected devices for free, or will issue a refund. To file a claim, go to nanolokedgerecall.com. Product numbers of affected devices are listed on the website.

For questions, call 3M’s customer service department at (833) 638-2697 or email 3musfpserviceaction@mmm.com.

House lawmakers call for automatic emergency braking on new commercial trucks, buses

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Washington — Automatic emergency braking would be a standard feature on all new commercial motor vehicles, including large trucks, under legislation introduced in July by Reps. Jesús “Chuy” García (D-IL) and Hank Johnson (D-GA). Read more

STOP USE of 3M DBI-SALA Nano-Lok Edge and Wrap Back Twin-Leg Self Retracting Lifelines

3M Fall Protection has announced an immediate stop use and product recall of the 3M™ DBI-SALA® Nano-Lok™ edge and Wrap Back Twin-Leg Self Retracting Lifelines. The twin-leg Nano-Lok edge is part of a personal fall protection system and connects two self-retracting lifelines/devices (SRL’s/SRD’s) directly under the dorsal d-ring of a worker’s harness. It is intended to be anchored at foot-level, and is designed for sharp edge applications. The twin-leg Wrap Back Nano-Lok is intended for wrapping around an anchor and incorporates a similar energy absorber. 3M has determined that in the event of a fall and under certain conditions, the energy absorber may not properly deploy which could expose the worker to serious injury or death.

RECALL NOTICE

Fatigue, drinking among driver behaviors that contribute to ‘perennial crisis’: report

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Austin, TX — More than 7 out of 10 people admit to driving drowsy, and nearly 1 in 4 say they’ve driven drunk, according to a recent report from online driving school DriversEd.com.

Researchers conducted an online survey of 957 licensed drivers. Results, published in the 2019 Behind-the-Wheel Confessions Report, show that 71% of the respondents reported they’ve driven while feeling drowsy, 24% admitted to driving drunk and 40% said they’ve experienced road rage.

“When it comes to driving safety, the country and its roadways are in a state of perennial crisis – and the situation is getting worse, largely thanks to phones, texting and social media,” Laura Adams, safety and education analyst for DriversEd.com, said in a May 31 press release.

Other findings:

  • 89% of the respondents said they’ve exceeded the speed limit.
  • 58% said they’ve rolled past a stop sign without making a complete stop.
  • 47% said they’ve run a red light.
  • 31% said they check their cell phone more often than they should.

“For each and every one of these hazardous behind-the-wheel behaviors, there are solutions – from checking your eyesight and hearing to assigning a designated driver to setting calendar reminders to inspect your tires to meditating before driving to simply exercising self-discipline,” Adams said.

Drivers operating on four to five hours of sleep are four times more likely to be involved in a traffic incident, according to the National Safety Council, which recommends getting at least seven hours of sleep before driving, and stopping to rest every two hours during long commutes.

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Lifting objects or manually handling materials puts workers at risk for back injuries. More than 111,000 such injuries requiring days away from work were recorded in 2017, according to “Injury Facts,” an online database created by the National Safety Council. What can employers and workers do to prevent them?    Continue Reading»

 

 

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Suicide in the Construction Industry: Breaking the Stigma and Silence

A suicide occurs every 12 minutes in the U.S. While these incidents touch every industry, one industry in particular has felt the impact of suicide in recent years – construction and extraction. A CDC study found that in 2012 and 2015, suicide rates were highest among males in the construction and extraction occupational group. Continue reading»