Creating workplaces where we all watch out for each other

Creating workplaces where we all watch out for each other

Prevent on-the-job backover deaths

Backover
Image: Missouri Department of Transportation

From 2018 to 2021, 277 U.S. workers died after being run or backed over by a vehicle, according to Bureau of Labor Statistics data cited by the Oregon Institute of Occupational Health Sciences.

These types of on-the-job deaths often involve large vehicles, such as those used in transportation and construction.

How can employers help workers stay safe? OIOHS offers tips:

  • Assign spotters to watch out for workers near vehicles with obstructed views.
  • Ensure spotters and drivers agree on and understand signals before backing up.
  • Equip large vehicles with cameras or sound sensors to warn drivers when someone or something appears in the vehicle’s blind spots.
  • Use wheel chocks to prevent unexpected vehicle movement.
  • Set the parking brake before exiting the vehicle.
  • When exiting the vehicle, only go under or behind it when the parking brake has been applied and the vehicle is on even ground.

McCraren Compliance offers a full range of safety and health training and consulting services. Plus we can help you incorporate well-being into your traditional systems in order to support the Total Worker Health of your workforce.

Call 888-758-4757, email info@mccrarencompliance.com or visit our website www.mccrarencompliance.com

Original article published by the National Safety Council

Gender-based violence in construction: DOL to host webinar

women-in-safety.jpg
Photo: Missouri Department of Transportation Flickr

Washington — OSHA and the Department of Labor Women’s Bureau have scheduled a free webinar exploring gender-based violence and harassment in the construction industry.

Slated for 2 p.m. Eastern on March 5, the hourlong webinar will focus on “how GBVH impacts worker health and safety,” and how it can be addressed. A construction worker, an employer, representatives from stakeholder groups and a representative from the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission are set to give presentations.

The webinar will offer Spanish interpretation services. It’ll be the second in a series of four on GBVH. OSHA and the Women’s Bureau are set to examine the issue in the service industry on Feb. 22.


McCraren Compliance offers a full range of safety and health training and consulting services. Plus we can help you incorporate well-being into your traditional systems in order to support the Total Worker Health of your workforce.

Call 888-758-4757, email info@mccrarencompliance.com or visit our website www.mccrarencompliance.com

Original article published by Safety+Health an NSC publication

Safety part of contractors group guide on AI in construction

AI-tech.jpg
Photo: metamorworks/iStockphoto

Washington — Artificial intelligence in construction is the subject of a new technology guide from Associated Builders and Contractors.

Along with defining common AI terms, the guide provides an overview of AI uses during the span of a construction project – from preconstruction to building maintenance. It also includes best practices for AI policy and links to more information.

AI has the potential to help “contractors complete projects on time, minimize staffing challenges, save money, and improve health and safety,” Matt Abeles, vice president of construction technology and innovation at ABC, said in a press release. “The construction industry is faced with a steep worker shortage of more than half of a million in 2024, and promising technologies like AI can help address this challenge.

“As younger workers become industry leaders, we must approach AI in construction as beneficial with a balanced view that includes continuous evaluation, developing ethical guidelines, and increasing awareness about what AI can and cannot do.”


McCraren Compliance offers a full range of safety and health training and consulting services. Plus we can help you incorporate well-being into your traditional systems in order to support the Total Worker Health of your workforce.

Call 888-758-4757, email info@mccrarencompliance.com or visit our website www.mccrarencompliance.com

Original article published by Safety+Health an NSC publication

Get ready for the National Safety Stand-Down to Prevent Falls in Construction

National-Safety--Stand-Down.jpg
Photo: OSHA

Washington — OSHA is encouraging employers to take a break and raise awareness of fall hazards and the importance of fall protection during the National Safety Stand-Down to Prevent Falls in Construction.

This year’s event is set for May 6-10. Falls from elevation accounted for 395 of the nearly 1,100 construction deaths in 2022, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Employers and workers can take part in activities such as toolbox talks, safety equipment inspections, rescue plan development or in-depth discussions on hazardous tasks.

Meanwhile, employers whose workers aren’t exposed to fall hazards can “use this opportunity to have a conversation with employees about the other job hazards they face, protective methods, and the company’s safety policies and goals,” OSHA says. “It can also be an opportunity for employees to talk to management about fall and other job hazards they see.”

Resources include suggestions to prepare for a successful stand-down and highlights from past events. A webpage lists events that are free and open to the public to help employers and workers find events near them.

Employers can download a certification of participation after the stand-down and share their activities on social media using the hashtag #StandDown4Safety.

OSHA initiated a National Emphasis Program on falls in May and hosted a webinar titled “Preventing Falls Through Improved Design” in March 2023.


Advancing Safe Human-Robot Interaction in Construction

Silhouette of man with collage of technical icons and images

Photo by ©Getty Images 

Robots have been part of popular culture for decades, from R2-D2 to the Terminator to Optimus Prime. More recently, however, robots have moved from the big screen to our everyday lives, including where we work.

These workplace robots can improve worker safety and well-being by operating in environments that are dangerous or unhealthy for people. There are an increasing number and type of robots in the workplace. Compared with 6 years ago, the global average robot density (robots per 10,000 employees) has more than doubled.

However, the use of robotics in the workplace also presents its own unique worker safety and health challenges. NIOSH created the Center for Occupational Robotics Research to address such challenges. The center aims to help ensure the safety of workers who use, wear, or work near robots.While NIOSH robotics research crosses multiple work sectors, one area of specific focus is construction. In 2019, the construction industry employed about 11.4 million workers. It also has some of the highest numbers of fatalities and injuries of all industries. As a high-risk industry, construction is a natural fit for using robots to minimize risk to workers. Robots laying bricks (masonry robots), demolishing buildings (demolition robots), and doing inspections at elevation (drones) are a few examples where robotic technologies could reduce worker risks. Read More


McCraren Compliance offers a full range of safety and health training and consulting services. Plus we can help you incorporate well-being into your traditional systems in order to support the Total Worker Health of your workforce.

Call 888-758-4757, email info@mccrarencompliance.com or visit our website www.mccrarencompliance.com

Original article published by NIOSH

Advisory Committee on Construction Safety and Health will meet on Feb. 21-22 in Washington

Committee, workgroup meetings will be held in person, online

WASHINGTON – The U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration has scheduled a meeting of the Advisory Committee on Construction Safety and Health for Thursday, Feb. 22, 2024, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. EST.

The meeting will include remarks from the Assistant Secretary for Occupational Safety and Health Doug Parker, updates on the construction industry from OSHA’s Directorate of Construction, a discussion about women in construction, reports from committee workgroups and a period during which the public is invited to make comments.

Three ACCSH workgroups will meet on Feb. 21. The Emerging Technology workgroup from 9-11 a.m.; the Workzone workgroup from 12-2 p.m.; and the Health in Construction workgroup from 2:10-4:10 p.m.

The full committee and workgroup meetings are open to the public and will be held in Conference Room C-5521, Room 4, U.S. Department of Labor, 200 Constitution Ave., NW, Washington DC 20210. Public attendance in-person is limited to 25 people.

To register for in-person attendance, contact Gretta Jameson at jameson.grettah@dol.gov by Feb. 15. Submit comments and requests to speak at the Federal eRulemaking Portal, Docket Number OSHA-2024-0002, by Feb. 15. Be sure to include the docket number on all submissions. Details on how to attend online are included in the docket and are available on the ACCSH webpage. Read the Federal Register notice for submission details.

The Contract Work Hours and Safety Standards Act, also known as the Construction Safety Act, established the committee to advise the Secretary of Labor and Assistant Secretary for Occupational Safety and Health on CSA-related policy matters and the setting of construction standards.


McCraren Compliance offers many opportunities in safety training to help circumvent accidents. Please take a moment to visit our calendar of classes to see what we can do to help your safety measures from training to consulting.

Original article published by Safety+Health an NSC publication

Work safely on scissor lifts

scissor-lift.jpg
Photo: Baloncici/iStockphoto

Scissor lifts – named for the way the lifting mechanism’s crossed beams raise and lower the work platform – are often used by manufacturing, warehouse and construction workers.

To safely operate a scissor lift, OSHA says two main elements must be addressed before work begins: proper positioning and stabilization.

Here’s what workers and employers can do:

Positioning

  • Implement traffic control measures around the lift to prevent other workers or equipment from approaching.
  • Use ground guides when operating or moving the lift.
  • Place the lift at least 10 feet away from power lines and other sources of electricity, as well as away from overhead hazards such as tree branches.

Stabilization

  • Don’t move the lift while it’s in the upright position.
  • Work in areas that have a level surface and don’t have hazards (holes or bumps) that can cause instability.
  • Use the lift outside only if weather conditions are good.
  • Don’t bypass safety features designed to stop the lift from collapsing.
  • Never allow the weight on the work platform to exceed the manufacturer’s load rating.
  • Don’t use equipment (such as a forklift) other than the scissor lift mechanism to raise the work platform.

And, as always, “Only trained workers should be allowed to use scissor lifts,” OSHA says, “and employers should make sure that those workers show that they can use a scissor lift properly.”

Employers should train workers to:

  • Check that a guardrail system is in place before working on the lift.
  • Stand only on the work platform – never stand on the guardrails.
  • Position work tasks within easy reach of the lift to avoid leaning away from it.

McCraren Compliance offers a full range of safety and health training and consulting services. Plus we can help you incorporate well-being into your traditional systems in order to support the Total Worker Health of your workforce.

Call 888-758-4757, email info@mccrarencompliance.com or visit our website www.mccrarencompliance.com

Original article published by Safety+Health an NSC publication

Suicide rate among working-age people up 33% in past two decades: CDC

construction-BW2.jpg

Photo: A-Digit/iStockphoto

Washington — Workplaces can play an important role in suicide prevention, researchers from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention say in a recent study.

The researchers looked at 2021 data from 49 states to calculate suicide rates for industry and occupational groups. They found that, overall, nearly 38,000 people (17.8 per 100,000 population) of working age (16-64 years old) died by suicide that year. That represents a 33% jump from the 2001 rate (13.4).

Major occupation groups with higher suicide rates included construction and extraction; farming, fishing and forestry; personal care and service; installation, maintenance and repair; and arts, design, entertainment, sports and media.

To help reverse the trend, the researchers recommend that employers integrate “evidence-based prevention strategies and training into existing policies and procedures.” That includes providing peer support, increasing access to mental health services, reducing stigma to encourage easier access to quality care and limiting access to “lethal means.”

CDC provides more information and guidance on its Suicide Prevention Resource for Action webpage.

The study was published online in CDC’s Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.


McCraren Compliance offers a full range of safety and health training and consulting services. Plus we can help you incorporate well-being into your traditional systems in order to support the Total Worker Health of your workforce.

Call 888-758-4757, email info@mccrarencompliance.com or visit our website www.mccrarencompliance.com

Original article published by Safety+Health an NSC publication

OSHA, National Demolition Association renew alliance to protect safety, health of demolition industry workers

WASHINGTON – The U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration and the National Demolition Association recently agreed to renew their alliance to improve the safety and health of workers in the demolition industry.

During the five-year agreement, the alliance will address industry hazards by developing safety and health training resources and seminars that focus on deconstruction and selective dismantlement of building components for reuse, repurposing, recycling and waste management. The alliance will also work with labor organizations, contractors and staffing associations, as needed, to share information in multiple languages and formats on a variety of topics including fall and heat illness prevention, recognizing hazardous materials, construction safety and protecting temporary workers.

Since the July 2021 signing of the original agreement, the alliance developed several products, including a document on managing predictable hazards when preparing for and implementing power plant demolitionguidelines for signage and door hanger use when notifying residential communities that will impacted by demolition work; and a podcast featuring OSHA Deputy Assistant Secretary for Occupational Safety and Health Jim Frederick.

Demolition work involves many of the hazards associated with construction, but includes additional hazards from unknown factors, such as changes or modifications that alter the original design, materials hidden within structural components, and unknown strengths or weaknesses of construction materials, as well as hazards created by the demolition methods used. Learn more about demolition hazards.

The National Demolition Association is a non-profit trade association comprising nearly 400 member companies nationally and internationally. The association provides educational resources on structural demolition and dismantlement, industrial recovery, recycling, architectural salvage decontamination, asbestos abatement and nuclear clean-up.

Through its Alliance Program, OSHA works with organizations such as trade and professional associations, labor unions, educational institutions, community and faith-based groups, and government agencies to share information about OSHA’s initiatives and compliance assistance resources with workers and employers, and educates workers and employers about their rights and responsibilities.


McCraren Compliance offers many opportunities in safety training to help circumvent accidents. Please take a moment to visit our calendar of classes to see what we can do to help your safety measures from training to consulting.

Original article published by OSHA

Commitment to Electrical Workers

OSHA renews partnership with employers, unions, trade groups to protect electrical transmission, distribution industry workers

WASHINGTON – The U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration has renewed a national strategic partnership to improve the safety and health of people employed in constructing and maintaining the national electrical grid with an emphasis on preventing life-threatening incidents and fostering safer work environments.

The five-year renewal includes more than a dozen companies, labor organizations and trade associations in the electrical transmission and distribution industry, and seeks to reduce worker injuries and fatalities by developing strategies to address industry hazards during construction, transmission and distribution work activities.

The partnership will collect data and address the causes of serious and potential serious injury and fatality rates, as well as the known drivers of these injuries and fatalities including mental health, megavolt amps, electrical contacts and arc flash events. Participants will also provide safety training on electrical, transmission and distribution and deploy automated external defibrillators to facilities, jobsites and vehicles.

Since 2018, the partnership has helped reduce industry fatality rates among its members by 91 percent, while the industry average rose by 14 percent. One fatal incident was reported in 2022, down from five in 2019. Since 2020, participating partners have trained more than 35,000 workers and developed nine best practices for the electrical transmission and distribution industry.


McCraren Compliance offers a full range of safety and health training and consulting services. Plus we can help you incorporate well-being into your traditional systems in order to support the Total Worker Health of your workforce.

Call 888-758-4757, email info@mccrarencompliance.com or visit our website www.mccrarencompliance.com

Original article published by OSHA