IBOEHS – Quarterly Newsletter

For   Their   Safety

Apr – May – Jun  2019    Volume 17, Issue 2

International Board of Environmental Health & Safety “Instilling Professionalism

  • Carelessness
  • Protecting Your Sight
  • Using Portable Generators Safely
  • Disease Dangers of Flood Waters
  • Afterthoughts and Regrets

Carelessness

 PATHS (PA Training for Health & Safety)

Have you ever done anything that wasn’t really smart? Something that you know put you at increased risk of injury? When you realized what you did, whether you were hurt or not, did you ask yourself, “Why did I ever do that?” For your own self-preservation, this should be a very important question for you to answer yourself.

Consider the fact that approximately 20 percent of injuries are due to unsafe conditions and 80 percent are caused by unsafe acts. If you realize that most unsafe conditions are brought about by human failure, then virtually all accidents/mishaps are brought about by unsafe acts. Why did you do something in an unsafe manner? To answer this question, you will need to put personal defenses aside and know that blame may lie within yourself. Also realize that there may be more than one reason for your actions and others may be involved. Continue reading»

 

Public Input Transportation Meetings

Pima Association of Governments invites you to review and comment on the region’s Transportation Improvement Program (TIP) for FY 2020-2024.

This meeting will cover regional funding for the next 5 years on roadways, transit, safety, interstate interchanges, and bicycle and pedestrian facilities.

 

Tuesday, March 26, 2019

4:00 – 6:00 p.m.

Randolph Golf Complex

Copper Room

600 S. Alvernon Way, Tucson

 

Wednesday, March 27, 2019

4:00 – 6:00 p.m.

Wheeler Taft Abbett Library

7800 N. Schisler Drive, Tucson

 

Friday, March 29, 2019

10:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

Joyner-Green Valley Library

Large Activity Room

601 N. La Cañada Drive, Green Valley

OSHA Requests Information on the Powered Industrial Trucks Standard

The U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) is requesting information as the Agency considers rulemaking to update the powered industrial trucks standards for general, maritime, and construction industries. The standards became effective in 1971, and were based on industry consensus standards from 1969. Since then, national consensus standards have been updated several times.

OSHA is requesting information on: the types, age, and usage of powered industrial trucks; maintenance and retrofitting; how to regulate older powered industrial trucks; types of accidents and injuries associated with operating these machines; costs and benefits of retrofitting the machines with safety features; and other components of a safety program. OSHA will use the information received in response to this request to determine what action, if any, it may take to reduce regulatory burdens and create jobs while improving worker safety.

Comments must be submitted on or before June 9, 2019. Comments and materials may be submitted electronically at http://www.regulations.gov, the Federal e-Rulemaking Portal, or by facsimile or mail. See the Federal Register notice for submission details.

Powered industrial trucks include forklifts, fork trucks, tractors, platform lift trucks, motorized hand trucks, and other specialized industrial trucks powered by an electrical motor or an internal combustion engine.

Under the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, employers are responsible for providing safe and healthful workplaces for their employees. OSHA’s role is to help ensure these conditions for America’s working men and women by setting and enforcing standards, and providing training, education and assistance. For more information, visit www.osha.gov.

OSHA Urges Employers to Prevent Worker Exposure to Carbon Monoxide

OSHA is reminding employers to take necessary precautions to protect workers from the potentially fatal effects of carbon monoxide exposure. Every year, workers die from carbon monoxide poisoning, usually while using fuel-burning equipment, tools, compressors and pumps, gas-powered forklifts, and other devices in buildings or semi-enclosed spaces without adequate ventilation. To reduce the risk of exposure, employers should install an effective ventilation system, use carbon monoxide detectors, and take other precautions as described in OSHA’s Carbon Monoxide Fact Sheet. Other OSHA resources include videos (in English and Spanish), QuickCards (in English and Spanish), and a fact sheet on portable generator safety.

OSHA Penalties Adjusting in 2019

OSHA’s civil penalties amounts for violations of workplace safety and health standards will increase in 2019 to adjust for inflation. The adjusted maximum penalty amounts will take effect upon publication in the Federal Register. New penalties for willful and repeat violations will be $132,598 per violation; serious, other-than-serious, and posting requirements are $13,260 per violation; and failure to abate violations are $13,260 per day beyond the abatement date.

Small Construction Contractors See Increase in Fatalities

Accidental deaths are rising for workers at small construction firms while dropping for larger companies, a new report shows.

Between 2008 and 2016, the fatality rate for construction firms with fewer than 20 employees rose 57 percent, according to the study by CPWR – The Center for Construction Research and Training. In contrast, fatalities at firms with 20 or more employees dropped 30 percent. Read more»