Tower workers: Are you using safety sleeves correctly?

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Photo: NATE: The Communications Infrastructure Contractors Association

Dayton, OH — Communications tower workers using cable safety sleeves for fall protection must make sure the cable is secured and properly tensioned before starting work.

The reminder is part of a new video from NATE: The Communications Infrastructure Contractors Association. The video highlights the continued collaboration between NATE’s Safety Equipment Manufacturers Committee and the University of Dayton’s Structures and Materials Assessment, Research, and Test (SMART) Laboratory. Together, the groups test equipment – under real-world conditions – that meets the standards of the American National Standards Institute.

The team performed more than 150 test drops. Its biggest takeaway?

“If you do not have tension on the wire rope, some of the sleeves will not function at all and may fall,” Joey Deuer, president and founder of Deuer Development, says in the video.

Other recommendations:

  • Only use the sleeve according to the manufacturer’s specifications.
  • Ensure the user’s harness or body doesn’t contact the sleeve while climbing.
  • Don’t park unsecured sleeves on a cable while not in use; they may fall if the cable starts shaking.
  • Undamaged sleeves can be reused for rescue retrieval.


McCraren Compliance offers a full range of safety and health training and consulting services. Plus we can help you incorporate well-being into your traditional systems in order to support the Total Worker Health of your workforce.

Call 888-758-4757, email info@mccrarencompliance.com or visit our website www.mccrarencompliance.com

Original article published by Safety+Health an NSC publication

Tower worker video offers overview of fall arrest lanyard testing

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Photo: NATE: The Communication Infrastructure Tower Contractors Association

Dayton, OH — Communications tower workers: Always use lanyards with appropriate fall clearance – and never connect the equipment back to itself unless that’s the way the lanyard is designed.

Those are two of the top takeaways of a new video from NATE: The Communication Infrastructure Tower Contractors Association.

The video provides an overview of how NATE’s Safety Equipment Manufacturers Committee works with the University of Dayton’s Structures and Materials Assessment, Research, and Test (SMART) Laboratory to test equipment – under real-world conditions – that meet the standards of the American National Standards Institute.

Recent testing examined the impact of long-distance falls involving the use of factor 1 lanyards, in which fall protection is tied off to an anchorage point above the head, and factor 2 lanyards, in which the anchorage point is at foot level.

John Lamond, vice president of sales at GME Supply Co., says in the video that factor 1 lanyards are designed to limit the distance of potential falls, while the foot-level tie-offs for factor 2 lanyards may increase the fall distance.

Workers should never connect with a factor 1 lanyard when a factor 2 lanyard is necessary, NATE says.

“We wanted to make sure we replicated how they’re using them in the field, what situations are most dangerous and what they may not know impacts them as they’re using a specific lanyard as they work,” Lamond said.

In the video, Sheri O’Dell-Deuer, vice president at Deuer Developments, says the SEMC checks lanyards after testing to ensure the carabiner and gate still work properly, and that the stitching remains intact. The committee also determines whether the shock pack has been deployed.

The video is the most recent installment in NATE’s Climber Connection series, which promotes safe work practices for communication tower workers.


McCraren Compliance offers a full range of safety and health training and consulting services. Plus we can help you incorporate well-being into your traditional systems in order to support the Total Worker Health of your workforce.

Call 888-758-4757, email info@mccrarencompliance.com or visit our website www.mccrarencompliance.com

Original article published by Safety+Health an NSC publication

Communication tower association committee tests worker safety gear

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Photo: NATE: The Communications Infrastructure Contractors Association

Dayton, OH — A new video from NATE: The Communications Infrastructure Contractors Association highlights the efforts of its Safety Equipment Manufacturers Committee to “test equipment the way it’s being used in the field.”

In cooperation with the University of Dayton’s Structures and Materials Assessment, Research, and Test (SMART) Laboratory, SEMC members test equipment – under real-world conditions – that meet the standards of the American National Standards Institute.

SEMC Chair Jeremy Buckles says in the video that the committee so far has developed five tests that simulate tasks during a tower climber’s workday.

“We wanted to show the climbers how their equipment functions under their everyday use. We want to make sure that we show the climbers if it’s supposed to function under motion, we’re going to test it for motion. There isn’t a standard test for that, so that’s what we’re here for.”

Buckles calls the committee a “group of friends” who share “a common goal of protecting the climbers, because our passion is for the industry.”

The video is the most recent installment in NATE’s Climber Connection series, which promotes safe work practices for communication tower workers. The association asks climbers and other industry stakeholders to use the hashtag #ClimberConnection when posting the video on social media platforms.


McCraren Compliance offers a full range of safety and health training and consulting services. Plus we can help you incorporate well-being into your traditional systems in order to support the Total Worker Health of your workforce.

Call 888-758-4757, email info@mccrarencompliance.com or visit our website www.mccrarencompliance.com

Original article published by Safety+Health an NSC publication

New video for tower workers: Suspension trauma

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Photo: NATE: The Communications Infrastructure Contractors Association.

First published by Safety+Health an NSC publication.

Watertown, SD — Proper rescue planning for suspension trauma incidents at tower sites is the focus of a new video from NATE: The Communications Infrastructure Contractors Association.

Suspension trauma, also known as orthostatic intolerance, can occur when a tower worker falls and remains suspended in a harness after his or her fall arrest system activates. The body may go into shock as a result of a disruption in blood flow, which may lead to unconsciousness and even death. Warning signs of suspension trauma are related to those associated with shock: pale complexion, feeling faint, sweating, leg numbness, nausea, dizziness and confusion.

Acting quickly is critical. If a climber notices signs of suspension trauma in a fellow climber and the worker is conscious, longtime rescue trainer Brian Horner advises getting the climber to move his or her legs to keep blood flowing. Ask the individual how he or she is doing, put the suspended climber in a horizontal position, and begin to safely lower him or her to the ground, seeking help from additional climbers if necessary.

If the individual is unconscious, however, “that’s where everything changes,” Horner said. “Everything now has got to be expedited, whether it be an airway, whether it be extrication, whether it be lowering. In fact, this guy now is a cardiac patient. The best treatment for this worker is down there,” Horner added, pointing to the ground.

Once a climber suffering from suspension trauma is lowered to the ground, employers or workers should call 911 and lay the individual flat to stabilize him or her. Then, if the climber is unconscious, place the patient on his or her left side to reduce vomiting, and wait for help to arrive.

Horner encourages industry workers and employers to view the video and “proactively pursue” additional training, education and research related to suspension trauma.

The video is the most recent installment in NATE’s Climber Connection series, which promotes safe work practices for communication tower workers. The association asks climbers and other industry stakeholders to use the hashtag #ClimberConnection when posting the video on social media platforms.