Creating workplaces where we all watch out for each other

Creating workplaces where we all watch out for each other

Operating Equipment Near Water – Safety Alert

Safety Alert 

Operating Equipment Near Water 

From 2010 through 2023, there were 19 drowning accidents. Eleven of these fatal accidents occurred when mobile equipment, operating near water, became submerged. When working near water mine operators should:

  • Conduct workplace examinations and eliminate hazardous conditions.
  • Keep mobile equipment a safe distance from the water’s edge.
  • Ensure miners wear a seatbelt when operating mobile equipment.

Emergency underwater breathing devices are commercially available, and they come in all different shapes and sizes. If made available and miners are properly trained, these devices can potentially increase miners’ chances of survival if they fall into water.

 

Eleven of these fatal accidents occurred when mobile equipment, operating near water, became submerged.
Best Practices
  • Provide emergency underwater breathing devices to miners with risk of falling into water.
  • Train miners in the use of underwater breathing devices in case of an emergency.
  • Keep water rescue equipment easily accessible.
  • To assist miners in exiting a submerged cab, develop an underwater emergency egress kit which may include a nose clip, mask, underwater breathing device, PFD, and glass breaking device.
  • Provide and ensure miners wear a Coast Guard approved Type I or Type V personal flotation device (PFD).

McCraren Compliance offers a full range of safety and health training and consulting services. Plus we can help you incorporate well-being into your traditional systems in order to support the Total Worker Health of your workforce.

Call 888-758-4757, email info@mccrarencompliance.com or visit our website www.mccrarencompliance.com

Original article published by MSHA

How to administer CPR

CPR.jpg
Photo: microgen/iStockphoto

According to Injury Facts, a website maintained by the National Safety Council, nearly 5,500 workers died on the job in 2022. How many of those workers could have been saved with CPR?

“Someone without oxygen can suffer brain damage in just four minutes,” NSC says, “and brain death in just eight to 10 minutes.”

That’s why having someone at your jobsite trained in CPR is so important. “CPR combines rescue breathing (to get oxygen into the victim’s lungs) with chest compressions (to pump the oxygenated blood to vital organs),” NSC says.

If a co-worker isn’t breathing, you’ll need to start CPR. Here are the steps to follow:

  1. Position your hands in the middle of the victim’s chest on the breastbone.
  2. Compress the chest quickly and rhythmically at the rate of 100-120 compressions a minute (the tempo of the Bee Gees’ song, “Stayin’ Alive”).
  3. Alternate chest compressions and rescue breaths. For every 30 chest compressions, give two rescue breaths.
  4. If you’re unable or unwilling to provide rescue breaths with compressions, you can perform “hands-only CPR” by compressing the chest continuously at a rate of at least 100-120 compressions a minute.

McCraren Compliance offers a full range of safety and health training and consulting services. Plus we can help you incorporate well-being into your traditional systems in order to support the Total Worker Health of your workforce.

Call 888-758-4757, email info@mccrarencompliance.com or visit our website www.mccrarencompliance.com

Original article published by Safety+Health an NSC publication

Survey outlines trucking industry’s commitment to safety

Photo-Missouri-DOT

Washington — The trucking industry remains committed to maintaining and improving safety – and has the receipts to prove it.

Recently released data from the American Trucking Associations’ Safety Spend Survey shows that, in 2022, the industry invested an estimated $14 billion in technology, training and “other expenditures” to boost highway safety. That’s an increase of more than 40% from the most recent survey conducted in 2015.

ATA polled motor carriers with fleets of all sizes. Respondents represented nearly 160,000 trucks and 170,000 drivers, an association press release states. Fleets’ investments were organized under five categories: onboard safety technology, training, incentives, safety-related maintenance and compliance costs.

“The trucking industry’s highest commitment is to keep our roads, drivers and the entire motoring public safe,” ATA President and CEO Chris Spear said. “This report clearly demonstrates that safety isn’t just a slogan for our industry, it is our mission. While others talk about their commitment to safety, the trucking industry is doing the work and investing in lifesaving technology and training every day.”


McCraren Compliance can help you understand and comply with FMCSA, USDOT and ADOT and ensure your drivers and your vehicles operate safely and efficiently.

Call us Today at 888-758-4757 or email us at info@mccrarencompliance.com to schedule your free FMCSA Compliance Assessment.

Original article published by Safety+Health an NSC publication

MSHA announces final rule to protect miners from surface mobile equipment-related accidents, injuries, fatalities

WASHINGTON – The U.S. Department of Labor today announced a final rule from its Mine Safety and Health Administration to help protect miners from accidents, injuries and fatalities related to surface mobile equipment. 

The rule requires mine operators to have written safety programs for surface mobile equipment — excluding belt conveyors — at surface mines and underground mines’ surface areas. The programs must include input from miners and their representatives and identify hazards and risks.

In recent years, powered haulage equipment and machinery have been the leading causes of serious and fatal mine accidents. The final rule aligns with MSHA’s overall effort to improve safety in equipment use. So far in 2023, 40 mining industry workers have suffered fatal injuries, including 16 classified as machinery and 10 classified as powered haulage fatalities.

“Given the number of serious and fatal machinery and powered haulage accidents that have occurred in recent years, the Mine Safety and Health Administration has worked hard to issue this final rule to enhance safety protections for miners working with and around surface mobile equipment,” said Assistant Secretary for Mine Safety and Health Chris Williamson. “As MSHA works with the entire mining community to implement the new rule, we strongly encourage everyone to prioritize training and to identify and eliminate machinery and powered haulage hazards that can put miners’ lives and livelihoods at risk.”

Earlier this year, Assistant Secretary Williamson sent an open letter to the mining community, noting MSHA will continue to use all its tools to combat the unacceptable upward trend in fatalities. The letter also announced an inaugural “Stand Down to Save Lives” event to encourage the nation’s mining community to take steps to prevent injuries and illnesses.

Other MSHA initiatives to combat the number of mining accidents, injuries, and fatalities in machinery, powered haulage equipment and other areas include safety and health alerts, the “Take Time, Save Lives” campaignPowered Haulage Equipment Guidance, and an Enhanced Enforcement Program.

District managers will discuss compliance assistance for the mining industry at stakeholder meetings beginning in January 2024.


McCraren Compliance offers a full range of safety and health training and consulting services. Plus we can help you incorporate well-being into your traditional systems in order to support the Total Worker Health of your workforce.

Call 888-758-4757, email info@mccrarencompliance.com or visit our website www.mccrarencompliance.com

Original article published by MSHA

2023 TRAM Conference, Oct. 10-12

MSHA to host annual conference for nation’s mine safety, health trainers at National Mine Health and Safety Academy.

Training Resources Applied to Mining conference will train the trainers

WASHINGTON – The U.S. Department of Labor announced today that its Mine Safety and Health Administration is holding its annual Training Resources Applied to Mining conference in Beaver, West Virginia, from Oct. 10 to 12.

The event will bring some of the industry’s leading mine safety and health trainers together to discuss best practices and new approaches for protecting miners at metal, nonmetal and coal mines across the nation.

“Our conference theme in 2023 challenges attendees to ‘Expand Your Reach’ and to strengthen their knowledge of approaches and techniques that can be applied at any mine site to prevent accidents and protect miners from hazards that can jeopardize their safety and health,” explained Assistant Secretary for Mine Safety and Health Chris Williamson. “For decades, the Training Resources Applied to Mining conference has helped training professionals improve their skills and infuse their training programs with new ideas and materials. Because MSHA continues to find deficiencies in miner training as root causes of fatal accidents, TRAM remains a valuable resource to help trainers provide quality training to our nation’s miners.”

Held at the National Mine Health and Safety Academy, the conference will include presentations by leading industry trainers and in-person and online workshops on topics ranging from how to better educate miners about designing new techniques in safety and health training. In addition, the conference will feature exhibits and demonstrations by MSHA, state grant recipients and other industry stakeholders.

The conference will also include the results of MSHA’s annual competition of mining-related training materials.

Conference attendance is free, but registration is required.

Learn more about the 2023 TRAM Conference

The National Mine Health and Safety Academy is the world’s largest educational institution devoted solely to safety and health in mining. The academy serves as the central training facility for federal mine inspectors, mine safety professionals from other government agencies, the mining industry and labor.


McCraren Compliance offers a full range of safety and health training and consulting services. Plus we can help you incorporate well-being into your traditional systems in order to support the Total Worker Health of your workforce.

Call 888-758-4757, email info@mccrarencompliance.com or visit our website www.mccrarencompliance.com

Original article published by MSHA

U.S. DOT Announces Over $30 Million in Grants to Support Firefighters, Local Hazardous Materials Safety Planning and Response Efforts

WASHINGTON – The U.S. Department of Transportation’s Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA) announced today that it is awarding over $30 million to support first responders and strengthen local efforts to respond to hazardous materials incidents.

“Firefighters and other local public servants are the everyday first-responder heroes that we rely on to immediately run to the emergency,” said PHMSA Deputy Administrator Tristan Brown. “These grants provide our emergency responders the resources they need to train and effectively respond to hazardous materials incidents.”

PHMSA is awarding grants to states, territories, tribes and non-profits through six of its grant programs. This includes approximately:

  • $22 million for Hazardous Materials Emergency Preparedness grants for states, territories, and tribes to train first responders on hazardous materials response and to support the development, implementation, and improvement of emergency plans for local and tribal communities.
  • $4.7 million in Hazardous Materials Instructor Training grants to support the training of hazardous materials instructors that train employees working with hazardous materials and first responders.
  • $1.3 million in Supplemental Public Sector Training grants to support non-profit organizations that train hazardous materials instructors conducting first responder trainings.

Continue reading “U.S. DOT Announces Over $30 Million in Grants to Support Firefighters, Local Hazardous Materials Safety Planning and Response Efforts”

MSHA announce $1M in grants awarded to support mine safety, health awareness; education, training

Grants seek to bolster education, training for key risks facing miners

WASHINGTON – The U.S. Department of Labor today announced the award of $1 million in grants to nine organizations in seven states to support education and training initiatives that will help identify and prevent unsafe working conditions in and around the nation’s mines.

Administered by the department’s Mine Safety and Health Administration, the Brookwood-Sago Mine Safety grant program will allow recipients to create training materials, promote and conduct mine safety training or educational programs, and evaluate the effectiveness of their efforts.

In awarding the grants, MSHA gave special emphasis to education and training programs that target miners at smaller mines and underserved populations in the industry. Training and education supported by the grants align with key MSHA priorities, ranging from better protecting miners from exposure to silica dust to mine rescues.

“The Mine Safety and Health Administration works collaboratively with industry, labor, academia and other stakeholders to protect the health and safety of all miners. Education and training is a vital tool in achieving this objective,” said Assistant Secretary for Mine Safety and Health Chris Williamson.

“In examining the mining industry’s troubling trend of fatalities this year, MSHA has found that training deficiencies continue to be a root cause of fatal accidents,” Williamson added. “The grants awarded today further key priorities of the agency and the Biden-Harris Administration, including preventing fatalities and serious accidents from safety issues, while also addressing miner health, such as preventing exposure to toxic materials like silica dust.”

Established under the Mine Improvement and New Emergency Response Act of 2006, the grant program honors 25 miners who perished in mine disasters in 2001 at the Jim Walter Resources #5 mine in Brookwood, Alabama, and in 2006 at the Sago Mine in Buckhannon, West Virginia.

“These grants recognize the sacrifice of 25 miners who died needlessly in two of the nation’s worst mine disasters in the last 25 years,” Williamson said. “The recipients of our 2023 Brookwood-Sago Mine Safety grants share our determination to keep miners safe and healthy at mines across the nation.”  Continue reading»


McCraren Compliance offers a full range of safety and health training and consulting services. Plus we can help you incorporate well-being into your traditional systems in order to support the Total Worker Health of your workforce.

Call 888-758-4757, email info@mccrarencompliance.com or visit our website www.mccrarencompliance.com

Original article published by MSHA

Workplace fire safety: What’s your plan?

evacuation-plan.jpg

Photo: s-c-s/iStockphoto

If a fire broke out at your workplace, would workers know what to do? Do they know what procedures to follow?

OSHA has advice for creating a workplace fire safety plan:

  • Describe the escape routes workers will use. If you have employees with a disability, clearly state the procedures to follow so they can evacuate safely.
  • Address how employees who stay behind to shut down critical equipment will evacuate.
  • Explain the preferred methods for alerting employees of a fire emergency.
  • Ensure workers receive emergency training.
  • Provide for an employee alarm system throughout the workplace.
  • Require employer review of the plan with new employees, as well as with all employees when the plan changes.

Want more tips on designing and implementing fire drills? check out Workplace fire drills: Regular practice keeps workers prepared for emergencies.


McCraren Compliance offers a full range of safety and health training and consulting services. Plus we can help you incorporate well-being into your traditional systems in order to support the Total Worker Health of your workforce.

Call 888-758-4757, email info@mccrarencompliance.com or visit our website www.mccrarencompliance.com

Original article published by Safety+Health an NSC publication

Women in safety face six common career challenges, researcher says

Sarah McCraren Safety Officer

Bowling Green, KY — Leadership training and organizational support may help bolster the well-being and careers of women in safety leadership positions, according to a researcher from Western Kentucky University.

Jacqueline Basham, a WKU instructor and associate safety professional, interviewed 15 female safety leaders to find out what career challenges they face and identify potential interventions that could be used to increase the number of females working in the industry.

She found six common barriers:

  1. Work hours and travel required
  2. Lack of formal education in safety before career began
  3. Low number of women in the industry
  4. Frequently having authority questioned on the job
  5. The notion that the industry is not for women
  6. Being perceived as young and inexperienced augmenting feelings of frustration around the job

As for the employer interventions that could help alleviate these barriers and create opportunities for more women in the field, Basham lists three:

  1. Offer resources related to child care and maternity leave, financial support, and scheduling flexibility
  2. Provide leadership training, along with training on specific occupational safety and health topics
  3. Establish support mechanisms, such as mentorship programs, and support from upper management and safety teams

“It’s important that workers know they are represented,” Basham said in a press release. “With almost half of the workforce being women, it is important that they feel represented in safety and know their safety at work is important and acknowledged.”


McCraren Compliance offers a full range of safety and health training and consulting services. Plus we can help you incorporate well-being into your traditional systems in order to support the Total Worker Health of your workforce.

Call 888-758-4757, email info@mccrarencompliance.com or visit our website www.mccrarencompliance.com

Original article published by Safety+Health an NSC publication

Catastrophic Safety Failure

Federal investigators find Ohio foundry’s failure to follow required safety procedures led to fatal steam explosion

Photo by: News 5 Cleveland

1 fatality, 15 injuries, and work site’s complete loss

BEDFORD, OH – A federal workplace safety investigation into a Beford foundry explosion that caused the death of a maintenance supervisor and injuries to 15 other employees found the operator, I. Schumann & Co. LLC, failed to protect workers from the hazard of steam explosions.

Inspectors with the U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration learned the explosion happened while employees inspected a water leak on a furnace used to smelt solid metals. OSHA determined water leaked onto the molten metal inside the furnace, causing a steam explosion. Inspectors found the company did not make sure that required lockout/tag out procedures were followed during the inspection of the furnace.

“This terrible tragedy could have been avoided if the employer followed well-known machine safety standards that are meant to prevent this type of explosion,” explained OSHA Area Director Howard Eberts in Cleveland, Ohio. “Sadly, a worker lost his life and 15 others were hurt in an incident that was entirely preventable. It’s exactly why employers need to follow required safety procedures and train their employees.”

OSHA cited the company for six serious violations and has proposed $62,500 in penalties. The foundry remains closed since the explosion.

Based in Bedford since 1917, I. Schumann & Co. today recycles material into metal alloys, ingots and pellets.

OSHA’s machine guarding and control of hazardous energy webpages provide information on what employers must do to limit worker exposures to machine hazards.


McCraren Compliance offers many opportunities in safety training to help circumvent accidents. Please take a moment to visit our calendar of classes to see what we can do to help your safety measures from training to consulting.

Original article published by OSHA