How to administer CPR

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Photo: microgen/iStockphoto

According to Injury Facts, a website maintained by the National Safety Council, nearly 5,500 workers died on the job in 2022. How many of those workers could have been saved with CPR?

“Someone without oxygen can suffer brain damage in just four minutes,” NSC says, “and brain death in just eight to 10 minutes.”

That’s why having someone at your jobsite trained in CPR is so important. “CPR combines rescue breathing (to get oxygen into the victim’s lungs) with chest compressions (to pump the oxygenated blood to vital organs),” NSC says.

If a co-worker isn’t breathing, you’ll need to start CPR. Here are the steps to follow:

  1. Position your hands in the middle of the victim’s chest on the breastbone.
  2. Compress the chest quickly and rhythmically at the rate of 100-120 compressions a minute (the tempo of the Bee Gees’ song, “Stayin’ Alive”).
  3. Alternate chest compressions and rescue breaths. For every 30 chest compressions, give two rescue breaths.
  4. If you’re unable or unwilling to provide rescue breaths with compressions, you can perform “hands-only CPR” by compressing the chest continuously at a rate of at least 100-120 compressions a minute.

McCraren Compliance offers a full range of safety and health training and consulting services. Plus we can help you incorporate well-being into your traditional systems in order to support the Total Worker Health of your workforce.

Call 888-758-4757, email info@mccrarencompliance.com or visit our website www.mccrarencompliance.com

Original article published by Safety+Health an NSC publication

Managing workplace stress: Employers can help

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Photo: XiXinXing/iStockphoto

Mental health issues among workers really came to the forefront during the COVID-19 pandemic. Before, employers may have had a “grin and bear it” attitude toward mental health. But today they’re encouraged to talk with workers and find solutions to stress and other workplace challenges.

OSHA’s Safe Workplace Good Headspace initiative highlights ways employers can make a difference:

  • Acknowledge that workers may be experiencing “heightened levels of loneliness, isolation, uncertainty, grief and stress.” On top of that, they may be caring for children or older parents, or family members or loved ones who have medical or substance misuse conditions.
  • Work with the employee to identify factors that may be making it a challenge for them to get their jobs done. Can adjustments be made? Make it clear to them: “We want to brainstorm with you to identify ideas for improving the support we provide our workers.”
  • Reassure employees that you’re “open and receptive” to talking about their work stress by creating a trustworthy space. “We need you to be our ‘eyes and ears’ and alert us to problems that need correction.”
  • Offer your workers coping and resiliency resources, workplace and leave flexibilities without penalty, and other supportive networks and services.

McCraren Compliance offers a full range of safety and health training and consulting services. Plus we can help you incorporate well-being into your traditional systems in order to support the Total Worker Health of your workforce.

Call 888-758-4757, email info@mccrarencompliance.com or visit our website www.mccrarencompliance.com

Original article published by Safety+Health an NSC publication

Suicide prevention hotline adds sign-language services

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Photo: Sinenkiy/iStockphoto

The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline – 988 – now features services in American Sign Language.

People can connect via video call with crisis counselors proficient in ASL by visiting 988lifeline.org and clicking “For Deaf & Hard of Hearing.” In a Sept. 8 press release, the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration says direct dialing to 988 from a videophone “will be available in the coming weeks.”

In the interim, people who use ASL to communicate can access video call services by dialing (800) 273-8255.

Data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows that, in 2021, suicide was the second-leading cause of death nationwide among people ages 10-14 and 25-34.

“Individuals across America who use ASL as their primary language can now readily access the support they need during a mental health crisis,” Health and Human Services Secretary Xavier Becerra said in the release.

The lifeline is available year-round, 24/7. SAMHSA transitioned it from an 800 telephone number in July 2022.


McCraren Compliance offers a full range of safety and health training and consulting services. Plus we can help you incorporate well-being into your traditional systems in order to support the Total Worker Health of your workforce.

Call 888-758-4757, email info@mccrarencompliance.com or visit our website www.mccrarencompliance.com

Original article published by Safety+Health an NSC publication

Quality conversations can boost happiness and well-being, study shows

Original article published by Safety+Health

Talking with a friend at least once a day – to catch up, lend a listening ear or just joke around – can improve your overall well-being, researchers say.

Their conclusion came after they asked more than 900 people from five different universities to use, for a day, one of seven communication methods: catching up, listening, meaningful talks, joking around, showing care, valuing others and their opinions, and offering sincere compliments. Later in the day, the participants reported on their well-being, connection, stress, anxiety, loneliness and the quality of their day.

The method of connection didn’t matter as much as the act of connecting with a friend, said lead study author Jeffrey Hall, a professor of communication studies at the University of Kansas. “One of the take-home messages of this study is that there are many paths toward the same goal.”

Additionally, Hall and his fellow researchers found greater positive effects on happiness and stress when the participants had more than one “quality conversation” a day.

“This means the more that you listened to your friends, the more that you showed care, the more that you took time to value others’ opinions, the better you felt at the end of the day,” Hall said.


McCraren Compliance offers many opportunities in safety training to help circumvent accidents. Please take a moment to visit our calendar of classes to see what we can do to help your safety measures from training to consulting.

Eating fast food may be linked to liver disease

Original article published by Safety+Health

Need another reason to cut back on fast food? You could lower your risk of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, University of Southern California researchers are saying.

The researchers looked at 2017-2018 data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey for 4,000 adults. They evaluated people’s fatty liver measurement and compared it with their fast-food consumption.

The result: People with diabetes or obesity who got at least 20% of their calories from fast food had “severely elevated levels” of fat in their livers compared with those who ate less fast food or didn’t eat it at all.

People who weren’t obese and didn’t have diabetes were still affected: They had moderate increases in liver fat when 20% of their calories came from fast food.

Fat in the liver can develop into nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and scarring of the liver. That scarring can lead to liver cancer or liver failure. Around 30% of people in the United States have nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, according to USC.

“If people eat one meal a day at a fast-food restaurant, they may think they aren’t doing harm,” lead study author Ani Kardashian, a hepatologist at the university, said in a press release. “However, if that one meal equals at least one-fifth of their daily calories, they are putting their livers at risk.”

The study was published online in the journal Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.


McCraren Compliance offers many opportunities in safety training to help circumvent accidents. Please take a moment to visit our calendar of classes to see what we can do to help your safety measures from training to consulting.

Not getting enough zzzs may up your risk of developing multiple chronic diseases

Original article published by Safety+Health

Is getting seven hours of sleep something you can only dream of? Results of a recent study suggest that falling two hours short of the recommended limit increases your risk of developing at least two chronic diseases.

Using data from nearly 8,000 British adults between 50 and 70 years old, researchers looked for links between sleep duration, mortality and whether participants had been diagnosed with chronic diseases such as heart disease, cancer or diabetes over 25 years.

Compared with the participants who slept up to seven hours a night, those who slept five hours or less a night at age 50 were 40% more likely to be diagnosed with multiple chronic diseases. They also had a 25% increased risk of mortality over the 25-year follow-up period.

The National Sleep Foundation recommends working-age adults get seven to nine hours of sleep a night. Older adults should get seven to eight hours.

“To ensure a better night’s sleep, it is important to promote good sleep hygiene, such as making the bedroom quiet, dark and at a comfortable temperature, before sleeping,” said lead study author Severine Sabia, a researcher at the University College London. “It’s also advised to remove electronic devices and avoid large meals before bedtime. Physical activity and exposure to light during the day might also promote good sleep.”

The study was published online in the journal PLOS Medicine.


McCraren Compliance can help you understand and comply with FMCSA, DOT and ADOT and ensure your drivers and your vehicles operate safely and efficiently.

Call us Today at 888-758-4757 or email us at info@mccrarencompliance.com to schedule your free FMCSA Compliance Assessment.

Do you spend a lot of time on your feet?

Original article published by Safety + Health

Photo property of CDC

Jobs that require frequent standing can lead to a number of health-related problems, including sore feet, leg swelling, muscle fatigue, low back pain, and stiffness in the neck and shoulders.

One possible fix for some workstations? Make them adjustable. “Being able to adjust the working height is particularly important to match the workstation to the worker’s individual body size and to the worker’s particular task,” the Canadian Center for Occupational Health and Safety says. “If the workstation cannot be adjusted, platforms to raise the shorter worker or pedestals on top of workstations for the tall worker should be considered.”

Other tips to reduce the negative effects of standing work:

  • Change working positions often.
  • Avoid extreme bending, stretching and twisting.
  • Give workers breaks to relax.
  • Organize work so materials are within easy reach.
  • Use a foot rail or portable footrest to shift body weight from both legs to one or the other.
  • Avoid reaching above or behind the shoulder line. Instead, shift feet to face the object.
  • Don’t reach beyond the point of comfort.

McCraren Compliance offers many opportunities in safety training to help circumvent accidents. Please take a moment to visit our calendar of classes to see what we can do to help your safety measures from training to consulting.

‘A ticking time bomb’: Survey finds many men don’t get annual physicals

First published by Safety+Health an NSC publication

Photo by Jenny Gold

Undetected or ignored health problems can become life-threatening, researchers are warning after 1 out of 3 men in a recent survey said they don’t need annual checkups.

The Harris Poll survey of nearly 900 men, commissioned by Orlando Health and conducted in May, also found that 2 out of 3 believe they’re generally healthier than most other men.

“It is statistically impossible for the majority of men to be healthier than the majority of men,” Thomas Kelley, family medicine specialist at Orlando Health Physician Associates, said in a hospital press release. “Even if you think you’re healthy and you’re not experiencing any symptoms, there can be developing issues that often go unnoticed and can also be life-threatening if left unchecked. Some of those include rising blood pressure that can be a ticking time bomb for a heart attack or stroke, as well as colon cancer, which is one of the most deadly, yet preventable, cancers that exist.”

Kelley urges men to establish a relationship with a primary care physician. This can help ease the “fear of the unknown” – an underlying reason why many men avoid the doctor’s office, he said.

“Most men find the process to be easier than they thought,” Kelley said. “It takes about half an hour, and by the end of the appointment, you have the big picture about where you stand, what you’re at risk for and what you need to do for your health in the future.”

He emphasizes that more men need to make annual health screenings a priority. Case in point, 38% of the respondents indicated they put their pet’s health ahead of their own.

“Men tend to put their health last after their family, and apparently even after their dog or their cat,” Kelley said. “But in order to take care of others in your life, you first have to take care of yourself, and that includes making that yearly appointment with your primary care doctor.”


McCraren Compliance assists employers in protecting their workers, starting with a comprehensive Work-site Analysis, Hazard Prevention, Controls, and Safety & Health Training.

Please contact us today at 888-758-4757 to learn how we can provide mine safety training and consulting for your business.

Survey shows 40% of adults aren’t willing to perform CPR

First published by Safety+Health an NSC publication

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Photo: American Heart Association

If a family member or co-worker went into cardiac arrest, would you be ready to react and deliver CPR?

Results of a recent survey show that although 9 out of 10 people are aware that performing CPR improves a person’s chance of surviving cardiac arrest, 2 out of 5 aren’t comfortable performing the potentially lifesaving technique.

The online survey, commissioned by the American Heart Association, sampled more than 1,000 U.S. adults. A quarter of participants said they would “always” perform CPR to assist someone in need.

As for the 40% of participants who said they wouldn’t perform CPR, lack of training or knowledge was the No. 1 reason why, cited by 60% of the group. That was followed by the fear of hurting someone or facing legal consequences and fear of contracting COVID-19.

Other findings:

  • 25% of the respondents said they weren’t aware of Good Samaritan Laws, which offer legal protection to anyone who gives reasonable assistance to someone who is in peril or injured.
  • 78% agree that CPR training should be offered at jobsites.

The AHA says more than 350,000 cardiac arrests occur outside of a hospital each year in the United States, and CPR – especially if immediately performed – can double or triple a person’s chance of survival. Additionally, fewer than half of people who experience cardiac arrest outside of a hospital receive CPR.

That’s why, in part, the AHA in 2009 launched a Hands-Only CPR campaign, to teach people two simple steps if a teen or adult suddenly collapses: call 911 and then press hard and fast in the center of the chest.

“The data in this survey shows that most adults understand that CPR saves lives but identifies a real gap in the willingness to actually be the one to deliver the lifesaving assistance, ” Anezi Uzendu, a cardiologist and an AHA volunteer expert, said in a press release.


McCraren Compliance offers many opportunities in safety training to help circumvent accidents. Please take a moment to visit our calendar of classes to see what we can do to help your safety measures from training to consulting.

Mental Health Awareness Month

First published by Safety+Health an NSC publication

“The workplace can be a key location for activities designed to improve well-being among adults,” the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says.

Take time this month – and all year round – to promote awareness of worker well-being. Suggestions from CDC:

  • Make mental health self-assessment tools available to employees.
  • Offer free or subsidized clinical screenings for depression from a qualified mental health professional.
  • Distribute materials, including brochures and videos, to employees about the signs and symptoms of poor mental health as well as opportunities for treatment.
  • Provide free or subsidized lifestyle coaching, counseling or self-management programs.
  • Host seminars or workshops that address depression and stress management techniques, such as mindfulness, breathing exercises and meditation, to help employees reduce anxiety and stress.
  • Create and maintain dedicated, quiet spaces for relaxation activities.
  • Provide managers with training to help them recognize the signs and symptoms of stress and depression in team members and encourage them to seek help from qualified mental health professionals.
  • Give employees opportunities to participate in decisions about issues that affect job stress.

To help employers understand the role they play in supporting the mental health of their employees, the National Safety Council and NORC at the University of Chicago created the Mental Health Cost Calculator for Employers, funded by Nationwide. This easy-to-use tool provides business leaders with data-driven insight about the costs of employee mental distress in their workplaces.

Find the calculator at nsc.org/mentalhealthatwork#.


McCraren Compliance assists employers in protecting their workers, starting with a comprehensive Work-site Analysis, Hazard Prevention, Controls, and Safety & Health Training.

Please contact us today at 888-758-4757 to learn how we can provide mine safety training and consulting for your business.