OSHA Requests Information on Possible Updates to the Lockout/Tagout Standard

OSHA is requesting information on a possible update of Control of Hazardous Energy (LOTO) Standard. Comments must be submitted on or before August 18, 2019. Comments and materials may be submitted electronically at http://www.regulations.gov, the Federal e-Rulemaking Portal, or by facsimile or mail. See the Federal Register notice for submission details.

New OSHA Resources Offer Solutions to Common Safety Hazards

A new series of OSHA Alerts addresses safety hazards associated with specific activities, equipment, or events. Each alert identifies the hazards involved and offers clear solutions to keep workers safe. Alerts currently available focus on flood recovery and cleanup, trenching and excavation, and forklift operation.

OSHA’s new flyer on five things you should know to stay safe in a trench addresses the most common trench-related hazards. The agency has additional resources for employers and workers on trenching safety, including a short video.

Forklift Manufacturers Emphasize the Importance of Operator Training

On June 11, forklift manufacturers from across the country convened in Washington, D.C., for National Forklift Safety Day to highlight the importance of operator training and daily equipment checks. OSHA Acting Assistant Secretary Loren Sweatt emphasized that “prevention has to be everyone’s goal.” Tips on safe work practices on or around forklifts are available in a new OSHA Alert.

U.S. Department of Labor to Hold Meeting to Solicit Public Input On OSH Act Whistleblower Protection Provision

OSHA will hold a meeting May 14, 2019, in Washington, D.C., to solicit public comments and suggestions from stakeholders on issues relating to whistleblower protection under Section 11(c) of the Occupational Safety and Health Act.

This is the third in a series of meetings at which OSHA is seeking public input on how it can improve whistleblower customer service, and enhance public understanding of the whistleblower laws. Continue reading»

OSHA Requests Information on the Powered Industrial Trucks Standard

The U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) is requesting information as the Agency considers rulemaking to update the powered industrial trucks standards for general, maritime, and construction industries. The standards became effective in 1971, and were based on industry consensus standards from 1969. Since then, national consensus standards have been updated several times.

OSHA is requesting information on: the types, age, and usage of powered industrial trucks; maintenance and retrofitting; how to regulate older powered industrial trucks; types of accidents and injuries associated with operating these machines; costs and benefits of retrofitting the machines with safety features; and other components of a safety program. OSHA will use the information received in response to this request to determine what action, if any, it may take to reduce regulatory burdens and create jobs while improving worker safety.

Comments must be submitted on or before June 9, 2019. Comments and materials may be submitted electronically at http://www.regulations.gov, the Federal e-Rulemaking Portal, or by facsimile or mail. See the Federal Register notice for submission details.

Powered industrial trucks include forklifts, fork trucks, tractors, platform lift trucks, motorized hand trucks, and other specialized industrial trucks powered by an electrical motor or an internal combustion engine.

Under the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, employers are responsible for providing safe and healthful workplaces for their employees. OSHA’s role is to help ensure these conditions for America’s working men and women by setting and enforcing standards, and providing training, education and assistance. For more information, visit www.osha.gov.

Get Ready for Safe + Sound 2019

Safe + Sound, OSHA’s year-round campaign to encourage every workplace to have a safety and health program, includes both employers and workers.  Participate in quarterly events on building an effective safety and health program in your workplace. Learn about best practices during webinars and put them into action during the 30-day challenges. These events also focus on management leadership, worker participation, and finding and fixing hazards. Share your safety successes during Safe + Sound Week, August 12-18, 2019. Sign up on the Safe + Sound website.