Creating workplaces where we all watch out for each other

Creating workplaces where we all watch out for each other

Gender-based violence in construction: DOL to host webinar

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Photo: Missouri Department of Transportation Flickr

Washington — OSHA and the Department of Labor Women’s Bureau have scheduled a free webinar exploring gender-based violence and harassment in the construction industry.

Slated for 2 p.m. Eastern on March 5, the hourlong webinar will focus on “how GBVH impacts worker health and safety,” and how it can be addressed. A construction worker, an employer, representatives from stakeholder groups and a representative from the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission are set to give presentations.

The webinar will offer Spanish interpretation services. It’ll be the second in a series of four on GBVH. OSHA and the Women’s Bureau are set to examine the issue in the service industry on Feb. 22.


McCraren Compliance offers a full range of safety and health training and consulting services. Plus we can help you incorporate well-being into your traditional systems in order to support the Total Worker Health of your workforce.

Call 888-758-4757, email info@mccrarencompliance.com or visit our website www.mccrarencompliance.com

Original article published by Safety+Health an NSC publication

OSHA issues a ‘hazard huddle’ challenge

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Photo: OSHA

Washington — OSHA has launched a challenge aimed at boosting worker participation in implementing hazard controls and job hazard analyses.

As part of the annual Safe+Sound campaign promoted by OSHA, NIOSH, the National Safety Council and other safety organizations, the Hazard Huddle Challenge encourages managers to have discussions with workers about workplace safety hazards.

Assemble workers with “varied experience levels and roles,” OSHA says, to ensure an expanded range of expertise.

Discussion questions may include:

  • Where have you or your co-workers had “close calls” that could have caused an injury? What happened?
  • How have you been hurt or injured on the job? What happened?
  • Describe a worst-case scenario for an injury on the job. Where and how might this happen?
  • Are there jobs workers perform that don’t align with organizational operating procedures?
  • What jobs typically are assigned to newer and less experienced staff? How could they get hurt performing those tasks?

OSHA calls on managers to listen and take notes during these meetings to determine where to conduct job hazard analyses. Managers preparing to implement hazard controls are reminded to consult workers whose jobs may be affected before doing so.

The agency asks participants to highlight their actions and progress on social media using the hashtag #SafeAndSoundAtWork. A virtual challenge coin is available for download for individuals who complete the challenge.


McCraren Compliance offers a full range of safety and health training and consulting services. Plus we can help you incorporate well-being into your traditional systems in order to support the Total Worker Health of your workforce.

Call 888-758-4757, email info@mccrarencompliance.com or visit our website www.mccrarencompliance.com

Original article published by Safety+Health an NSC publication

Get ready for the National Safety Stand-Down to Prevent Falls in Construction

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Photo: OSHA

Washington — OSHA is encouraging employers to take a break and raise awareness of fall hazards and the importance of fall protection during the National Safety Stand-Down to Prevent Falls in Construction.

This year’s event is set for May 6-10. Falls from elevation accounted for 395 of the nearly 1,100 construction deaths in 2022, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Employers and workers can take part in activities such as toolbox talks, safety equipment inspections, rescue plan development or in-depth discussions on hazardous tasks.

Meanwhile, employers whose workers aren’t exposed to fall hazards can “use this opportunity to have a conversation with employees about the other job hazards they face, protective methods, and the company’s safety policies and goals,” OSHA says. “It can also be an opportunity for employees to talk to management about fall and other job hazards they see.”

Resources include suggestions to prepare for a successful stand-down and highlights from past events. A webpage lists events that are free and open to the public to help employers and workers find events near them.

Employers can download a certification of participation after the stand-down and share their activities on social media using the hashtag #StandDown4Safety.

OSHA initiated a National Emphasis Program on falls in May and hosted a webinar titled “Preventing Falls Through Improved Design” in March 2023.


CDC study explores severe injury trends in oil and gas extraction industry

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Photo: brazzo/iStockphoto

Washington — Oil and gas extraction operators should include contract workers in site safety management plans, improve job and equipment hazards training, and reinforce safety practices, a recent study concludes.

Researchers from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention looked at OSHA data from January 2015 to July 2022 to determine severe industry trends in the oil and gas extraction industry. The industry reported more than 2,100 work-related severe injuries (those resulting in amputation, loss of an eye or inpatient hospitalization) to OSHA during the study period. Of those, more than 2,100 (2.6%) were in the oil and gas extraction industry – over 70% of which were incurred by oil and gas operations support activities personnel. Oil and gas well drillers accounted for 23% of the 2,100-plus injuries.

Well service contract workers experienced the most hospitalizations (1,194) and amputations (417), accounting for 57% and 20%, respectively, of all the severe injuries reported. Nearly 900 (43%) of the severe injuries reported in the industry involved upper extremities.

The researchers recommend that oil and gas extraction operators provide workers with appropriate personal protective equipment and conduct daily site safety meetings.

The study was published online in the CDC’s Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.


McCraren Compliance offers a full range of safety and health training and consulting services. Plus we can help you incorporate well-being into your traditional systems in order to support the Total Worker Health of your workforce.

Call 888-758-4757, email info@mccrarencompliance.com or visit our website www.mccrarencompliance.com

Original article published by Safety+Health an NSC publication

OSHA final rule on worker walkaround representation under White House review

OSHA logo
Photo property of OSHA

Washington — OSHA’s rule on worker walkaround representation is undergoing a final review, according to the White House Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs website.

The final rule was sent to OIRA on Feb. 9. It’s unknown how long the office will take to complete the review – one of the final steps in the regulatory process.

The rule would allow workers to designate someone who doesn’t work for their employer – including a labor union member – to represent them during the “walkaround” part of an OSHA inspection.

Under OSHA 1903.8, a walkaround representative “shall be an employee(s) of the employer.” However, the regulation also allows an OSHA inspector, also known as a compliance safety and health officer, to make a judgment call on whether a third party can participate in the walkaround.

OSHA first published a proposed rule on the worker walkaround representative designation in August.

“The proposed revisions do not change existing regulations that give OSHA compliance officers the authority to determine if an individual is authorized by employees and to prevent someone from participating in the walkaround inspection if their conduct interferes with a fair and orderly inspection, or to limit participation to protect employer trade secrets,” an OSHA press release stated.

After extending the comment period to the end November, the agency received comments from Republican and Democrat leaders of the House Education and the Workforce Committee.

Rep. Virginia Foxx (R-NC), chair of the committee, submitted a comment suggesting that OSHA “abandon” the proposal, claiming the Department of Labor is “putting its political goal of promoting unionization at all costs ahead of keeping workers safe.”

She added: “Congress created OSHA and entrusted it with the important mission of protecting the health and safety of the nation’s workers. In order to uphold this vital mission, OSHA should abandon the proposed walkaround rule, which will upend the long-standing inspection process, interfere with labor-management relations, and harm employers and workers.”

Rep. Bobby Scott (D-VA), ranking member of the committee, wrote that OSHA should accept a worker-designated representative by default instead of requiring CSHO approval.

“OSHA has wisely recognized in the proposed rule that it should advise its inspectorate to recognize the value that a third party put forward as the workers’ walkaround representative can add to an inspection. … [However,] OSHA should more boldly rewrite the proposed rule to accept workers’ choice of representative by default and maximize workers’ rights to representation of their own choosing throughout the inspection, enforcement and contest processes.”

Also submitting a comment in support of the proposal was a group of 67 organizations. Among those in the coalition is the National Council for Occupational Safety and Health and Sur Legal Collaborative, an immigrant and worker rights nonprofit.

“Giving workers the right to select someone as their representative is critical to ensuring their safety and health,” Shelly Anand, co-founder and executive director of the Sur Legal Collaborative, said in a National COSH press release. “Many times workers don’t even know they have the right to participate in the walkaround process.

“Even if they do know, however, many do not feel safe participating for fear of retaliation, especially if they are immigrants and non-English speaking. Without this rule, abusive employers will continue to fight tooth and nail to narrow the scope of OSHA inspections, preventing OSHA from viewing dangerous working conditions.”


McCraren Compliance offers many opportunities in safety training to help circumvent accidents. Please take a moment to visit our calendar of classes to see what we can do to help your safety measures from training to consulting.

Original article published by Safety+Health an NSC publication

CSB to OSHA: Extend PSM standard to onshore oil and gas drilling

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Photo: Chemical Safety Board

Washington — Onshore oil and gas wells need appropriate well planning and control measures in place to “mitigate the potential for the ignition of flammable material,” the Chemical Safety Board says.

The recommendation is one of many in the board’s recently released final report on a January 2020 fire at the Wendland oil well in Texas’ Burleson County.

Three workers died and another suffered serious injuries after an ignition of hydrocarbons triggered a flash fire. Investigators found that the well operator and its contractors failed to enact thorough planning and control measures, leading to the release of the hydrocarbons.

CSB says insufficient industry guidance on well control for wells in an underpressured reservoir also contributed to the incident.

The agency renews its call on OSHA to either extend its standard on process safety management to the drilling of onshore oil and gas wells, customize it to oil and gas drilling operations, or create a new standard.

Addressing the report during a Jan. 25 CSB public business meeting, investigator-in-charge Harold Griffin said OSHA “has historically exempted” onshore oil and gas drilling from its standards on PSM and lockout/tagout (1910.147) despite it being a high-risk industry.

Griffin added: “As a result, there are minimal regulations that govern onshore oil and gas drilling and servicing operations despite prior attempts to promulgate special rules for this industry.”

CSB also recommends that companies with onshore oil and gas operations incorporate ignition source risk assessments in organizational policies while following industry regulations on the placement of ignition sources.

“As the U.S. continues to expand domestic energy production, both industry and the federal government must ensure that onshore oil and gas operations are conducted safely and under proper oversight,” CSB Chair Steve Owens said in a press release. “Three workers died because adequate steps were not taken to prevent this blowout and the fire that resulted.”


McCraren Compliance offers a full range of safety and health training and consulting services. Plus we can help you incorporate well-being into your traditional systems in order to support the Total Worker Health of your workforce.

Call 888-758-4757, email info@mccrarencompliance.com or visit our website www.mccrarencompliance.com

Original article published by Safety+Health an NSC publication

OSHA updates enforcement policy on process safety management

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Photo: kodda/iStockphoto

Washington — OSHA has updated its process safety management enforcement policy for the first time in 30 years.

The agency announced the change in a directive that went into effect Jan. 26. The directive is intended for OSHA inspectors and other personnel, but also provides insight to employers and workers covered under the standard.

Much of the document is in a question-and-answer format, covering subjects such as:

  • Process hazard analysis
  • Operating procedures
  • Training
  • Incident investigations
  • Emergency planning and response
  • Compliance audits

Appendix A in the document is intended to clarify some parts of OSHA’s standard on PSM. Appendix B includes links to letters of interpretation, which formed the basis for the Q&A. Appendix C contains an index of common terms and phrases.

“OSHA promulgated the PSM standard in 1992 in response to the numerous catastrophic chemical manufacturing incidents that occurred worldwide,” the directive states. “Since the promulgation of the standard, numerous questions have been submitted and compliance guidance provided to industry on the application of the standard.”

State plans must notify OSHA of their intent to adopt the directive within 60 days. Otherwise, they must have policies and procedures that are “identical to or different from the federal program.” Either way, state plan adoption must occur within six months.


McCraren Compliance offers a full range of safety and health training and consulting services. Plus we can help you incorporate well-being into your traditional systems in order to support the Total Worker Health of your workforce.

Call 888-758-4757, email info@mccrarencompliance.com or visit our website www.mccrarencompliance.com

Original article published by Safety+Health an NSC publication

OSHA to employers: Post Form 300A by Feb. 1

Form 300A
Photo: OSHA

Washington — OSHA is reminding employers of their Form 300A posting requirement that begins Feb. 1.

Form 300A, a summary of work-related injuries and illnesses, must be displayed “in a conspicuous place or places where notices to employees are customarily posted” until April 30.

Employers who have 10 or fewer employees, including temporary or part-time workers, or those in certain low-hazard industries are exempt from the requirement.

Employers also must maintain injury and illness records for five years at their worksites, and provide copies, if requested, to current or former employees or their representatives.


McCraren Compliance offers a full range of safety and health training and consulting services. Plus we can help you incorporate well-being into your traditional systems in order to support the Total Worker Health of your workforce.

Call 888-758-4757, email info@mccrarencompliance.com or visit our website www.mccrarencompliance.com

Original article published by Safety+Health an NSC publication

Advisory Committee on Construction Safety and Health will meet on Feb. 21-22 in Washington

Committee, workgroup meetings will be held in person, online

WASHINGTON – The U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration has scheduled a meeting of the Advisory Committee on Construction Safety and Health for Thursday, Feb. 22, 2024, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. EST.

The meeting will include remarks from the Assistant Secretary for Occupational Safety and Health Doug Parker, updates on the construction industry from OSHA’s Directorate of Construction, a discussion about women in construction, reports from committee workgroups and a period during which the public is invited to make comments.

Three ACCSH workgroups will meet on Feb. 21. The Emerging Technology workgroup from 9-11 a.m.; the Workzone workgroup from 12-2 p.m.; and the Health in Construction workgroup from 2:10-4:10 p.m.

The full committee and workgroup meetings are open to the public and will be held in Conference Room C-5521, Room 4, U.S. Department of Labor, 200 Constitution Ave., NW, Washington DC 20210. Public attendance in-person is limited to 25 people.

To register for in-person attendance, contact Gretta Jameson at jameson.grettah@dol.gov by Feb. 15. Submit comments and requests to speak at the Federal eRulemaking Portal, Docket Number OSHA-2024-0002, by Feb. 15. Be sure to include the docket number on all submissions. Details on how to attend online are included in the docket and are available on the ACCSH webpage. Read the Federal Register notice for submission details.

The Contract Work Hours and Safety Standards Act, also known as the Construction Safety Act, established the committee to advise the Secretary of Labor and Assistant Secretary for Occupational Safety and Health on CSA-related policy matters and the setting of construction standards.


McCraren Compliance offers many opportunities in safety training to help circumvent accidents. Please take a moment to visit our calendar of classes to see what we can do to help your safety measures from training to consulting.

Original article published by Safety+Health an NSC publication

Workplace mental health: OSHA publishes new fact sheet

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Photo: Drazen_/iStockphoto

Washington — A new fact sheet from OSHA is intended to help employers prioritize workers’ mental health.

“Mental health is an important component of overall well-being and is equally as vital as physical health for all employees,” OSHA says. “Mental health concerns due to work have the potential to adversely impact an employee’s social interactions, productivity, performance and absenteeism.”

The fact sheet – available in English and Spanish – outlines the effects of stress, traumatic events and substance use disorders on a worker’s mental health. It also touches on suicide, listing ways to contact crisis counselors.

OSHA says it plans to incorporate information from the fact sheet into the introduction of its 10- and 30-hour outreaching training courses.


McCraren Compliance offers a full range of safety and health training and consulting services. Plus we can help you incorporate well-being into your traditional systems in order to support the Total Worker Health of your workforce.

Call 888-758-4757, email info@mccrarencompliance.com or visit our website www.mccrarencompliance.com

Original article published by Safety+Health an NSC publication