Bloodborne pathogens: Oregon OSHA launches Spanish-language training course

First published by Safety+Health an NSC publication
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Photo: Oregon OSHA

Salem, OR — Oregon OSHA has launched a Spanish-language online training course on bloodborne pathogens for health care, emergency response, hospitality and other industries.

Bloodborne pathogens – infectious microorganisms in human blood that can cause diseases such as hepatitis B, hepatitis C and HIV – can be transmitted to workers via needlestick, broken glass or other sharps.

Aimed at helping employers meet the requirements of Oregon OSHA’s standard on bloodborne pathogens, the free course includes videos, interactive scenarios and a quiz. Topics covered include assessing the potential for exposure, the elements and management of an exposure-control plan, and preventing and reducing exposures.

“It takes solid planning, training and other critical steps to address the potential on-the-job hazards of bloodborne pathogens,” Julie Love, interim administrator of Oregon OSHA, said in a press release. “But language barriers can pose challenges to taking those steps. That is why we’re offering this new tool to help break down those barriers.”

Oregon OSHA, which operates under federal OSHA’s State Plan program, has also published a bloodborne pathogens guide that includes answers to key questions about workplace exposure.


McCraren Compliance offers many opportunities in safety training to help circumvent accidents. Please take a moment to visit our calendar of classes to see what we can do to help your safety measures from training to consulting.

U.S. Department of Labor announces annual adjustments to OSHA civil penalties

First published by OSHA

WASHINGTON – The U.S. Department of Labor announced adjustments to Occupational Safety and Health Administration civil penalty amounts based on cost-of-living adjustments for 2022.

In 2015, Congress passed the Federal Civil Penalties Inflation Adjustment Act Improvements Act to advance the effectiveness of civil monetary penalties and to maintain their deterrent effect. Under the Act, agencies are required to publish “catch-up” rules that adjust the level of civil monetary penalties, and make subsequent annual adjustments for inflation no later than January 15 of each year.

OSHA’s maximum penalties for serious and other-than-serious violations will increase from $13,653 per violation to $14,502 per violation. The maximum penalty for willful or repeated violations will increase from $136,532 per violation to $145,027 per violation.

Visit the OSHA Penalties page for more information. The Department of Labor Federal Civil Penalties Inflation Adjustment Act Annual Adjustments for 2022 final rule is effective January 15, 2022, and the increased penalty levels apply to any penalties assessed after January 15, 2022.

Under the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, employers are responsible for providing safe and healthful workplaces for their employees. OSHA’s role is to help ensure these conditions for America’s workers by setting and enforcing standards, and providing training, education and assistance.


McCraren Compliance offers many opportunities in safety training to help circumvent accidents. Please take a moment to visit our calendar of classes to see what we can do to help your safety measures from training to consulting.

Supreme Court mulling decision on OSHA’s ETS on COVID-19

First published by Safety+Health an NSC publication

Washington — Who gets to decide how to protect workers against COVID-19? That was one of the central questions posed by opponents of OSHA’s emergency temporary standard on COVID-19 vaccination, testing and masking during a Jan. 7 hearing before the U.S. Supreme Court.

Scott Keller, attorney for the National Federation of Independent Business, presented the question in a response to questioning from Justice Stephen Breyer early in the two-hour hearing. “You said the question is, ‘Who decides?’” Justice Elena Kagan said to Keller later in the hearing. “I think that’s right. I think that is the question.”

Kagan contended in her questioning that OSHA has experts on workplace safety and is politically accountable to the public via the election of presidents and representatives in Congress.

“Courts are not politically accountable,” she said. “Courts have not been elected. Courts have no epidemiological expertise. Why in the world would courts decide this question?”

Keller and Ohio Solicitor General Benjamin Flowers contended that Congress didn’t give OSHA clear authority to address vaccinations in the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970. The duo also argued that states and private businesses can decide how to protect workers from COVID-19.

Chief Justice John Roberts expressed similar thoughts to U.S. Solicitor General Elizabeth Prelogar, who was arguing on behalf of the government.

“It sounds like the sort of thing that states will be responding to, or should be, and Congress should be responding to, rather than agency by agency of the federal government and the executive branch acting alone.”

Justice Sonia Sotomayor mentioned that “certain states … are stopping employers from requiring vaccines” and masks.

“Why shouldn’t the federal government, which … Congress has decided to give OSHA the power to regulate workplace safety, have a national rule that will protect workers?” she asked.

Reading from the OSH Act, Sotomayor noted that Congress gave OSHA the authority to develop “innovative methods, techniques and approaches for dealing with occupational health and safety problems.”

Prelogar pointed to Section 20(a)(5), which reads: “Nothing in this or any other provision of this act shall be deemed to authorize or require medical examination, immunization, or treatment for those who object thereto on religious grounds, except where such is necessary for the protection of the health or safety of others.”

OSHA – Electronic reporting deadline approaching

First published by OSHA

US Department of Labor reminds specific employers to submit
required 2021 injury, illness data by March 2, 2022

WASHINGTON – The U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration reminds employers that the agency began collecting calendar year 2021 Form 300A data on Jan. 2, 2022. Employers must submit the form electronically by March 2, 2022.

Electronic submissions are required by establishments with 250 or more employees currently required to keep OSHA injury and illness records, and establishments with 20-249 employees classified in specific industries with historically high rates of occupational injuries and illnesses.

Visit the Injury Tracking Application Electronic Submission of Injury and Illness Records to OSHA for more information and a link to the Injury Tracking Application.

Photo: OSHA

McCraren Compliance offers many opportunities in safety training to help circumvent accidents. Please take a moment to visit our calendar of classes to see what we can do to help your safety measures from training to consulting.

OSHA: The First 50 Years

First published by OSHA

US Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration releases video
highlighting 50 years of protecting America’s workers, ensuring safer workplaces

WASHINGTON – Fifty years ago, the U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration began to fulfill the mission that led to its creation – to ensure safe and healthful working conditions for every worker in America.

To help OSHA mark its first 50 years of transforming the safety and health of workplaces nationwide, the agency has released a video that commemorates major accomplishments and important events throughout its history. Secretary of Labor Marty Walsh, Assistant Secretary for Occupational Safety and Health Douglas Parker and past agency assistant secretaries provide commentary, and reflect on the agency’s past and continued mission.

“At the core of our work is the fundamental right for all workers to be protected on the job and empowered to speak up about unsafe conditions,” said Assistant Secretary for Occupational Safety and Health Douglas Parker. “As we look ahead to the next 50 years, we must continue working hard to ensure that every worker – no matter what job they do or what language they speak – has the protections they need and deserve.”

OSHA invites the public to visit the OSHA at 50 webpage to learn more about the agency’s 50 years of progress in workplace safety and health.


McCraren Compliance offers many opportunities in safety training to help circumvent accidents. Please take a moment to visit our calendar of classes to see what we can do to help your safety measures from training to consulting.

Did you know that the fatal injury rate for Hispanic or Latino workers rose in 2020?

First published by OSHA
Did You Know?
The fatal injury rate for all workers declined in 2020, but the rate for Hispanic or Latino workers rose. It was the only race or ethnic group shown on the chart below to see an increase. To learn more about fatal occupation injuries, see “Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries Summary, 2020.” CFOI reports fatal workplace injuries only; it does not report any illness related information, including COVID-19.
¿Sabías?
La tasa de lesiones mortales para todos los trabajadores disminuyó en 2020, pero la tasa de los trabajadores hispanos o latinos aumentó. Fue la única raza o grupo étnico que aparece en el gráfico siguiente que vio un aumento. Para saber más sobre las lesiones ocupacionales mortales, consulte el “Resumen del Censo de lesiones ocupacionales mortales, 2020.” (en inglés) CFOI sólo informa de las lesiones mortales en el lugar de trabajo; no comunica ninguna información relacionada con las enfermedades, incluido el COVID-19.
Chart showing rate of fatal work injuries by race or ethnic origin, 2019-20The fatal work injury rate for all workers was 3.4 fatalities per 100,000 full-time equivalent (FTE) workers, down from 3.5 in 2019. In the same time period, the fatal work injury rate for Hispanic or Latino workers rose to 4.5 per 100,000 full-time equivalent (FTE) workers, up from 4.2 and was the only race or ethnic group to see an increase in the fatal work injury rate out of the groups shown in the chart.

McCraren Compliance offers many opportunities in safety training to help circumvent accidents. Please take a moment to visit our calendar of classes to see what we can do to help your safety measures from training to consulting.

Enforcement of OSHA’s COVID-19 ETS to begin Jan. 10

First published by Safety+Health an NSC publication

Cincinnati — The 6th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals upheld OSHA’s emergency temporary standard on COVID-19 vaccination, testing and masking, with a 2-1 decision issued Dec. 17.

The decision ends a stay issued by the New Orleans-based 5th Circuit on Nov. 12 and means the implementation and enforcement of the ETS can move forward.

The 6th Circuit was chosen to consider a consolidated challenge to the ETS via a lottery, conducted by the Judicial Panel on Multidistrict Litigation on Nov. 16 after 27 petitions were filed for review in 12 appeals courts.

According to a Dec. 18 press release, OSHA won’t issue citations “for noncompliance with any requirements of the ETS” before Jan. 10 and won’t issue citations for testing requirements before Feb. 9, “so long as an employer is exercising reasonable, good faith efforts to come into compliance with the standard.” Additionally, the agency will provide compliance assistance to covered employers.

“OSHA can now once again implement this vital workplace health standard, which will protect the health of workers by mitigating the spread of the unprecedented virus in the workplace,” the release states.

Hours after the decision was handed down, 27 states and “a long list of companies and organizations” filed an appeal with the Supreme Court, according to a press release from South Carolina Attorney General Alan Wilson’s office.

“This case does not present the question whether vaccines or vaccine mandates are wise or desirable,” the release states. “Instead, it presents the narrow questions whether OSHA had authority to issue the mandate and whether it lawfully exercised whatever authority it had. After all, ‘our system does not permit agencies to act unlawfully,’ even during a pandemic and ‘even in pursuit of desirable ends.’”

OSHA published the ETS in the Nov. 5 Federal Register, giving employers with 100-plus employees 30 days to develop, implement and enforce a mandatory COVID-19 vaccination policy – or provide a policy that gives workers the choice to get vaccinated or undergo weekly COVID-19 testing.

Covered employees had an initial deadline of Jan. 4 to become fully vaccinated, or begin weekly testing and wear a face covering while indoors or in a vehicle “with another person for work purposes.”


McCraren Compliance offers many opportunities in safety training to help circumvent accidents. Please take a moment to visit our calendar of classes to see what we can do to help your safety measures from training to consulting.

OSHA considers revoking Arizona’s State Plan status

First published by Safety+Health an NSC publication
Photo: OSHA

The Department of Labor’s regulatory agenda for Fall 2021, released Dec. 10, includes a proposed rule that – should OSHA decide to move forward on it – would revoke Arizona’s State Plan status.

The agenda – issued by the Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs twice a year – provides the status of and projected dates for all potential regulations listed in three stages: pre-rule, proposed rule and final rule. Listings marked “long term” aren’t expected to be worked on for at least six months.

Arizona is the lone state that hasn’t issued an emergency temporary standard on COVID-19 for health care workers. OSHA published its ETS in June, and State Plan states had 30 days to adopt their own standard.

Arizona, South Carolina and Utah didn’t meet that deadline. The latter two states, however, have since issued an ETS after federal OSHA reportedly sent “courtesy letters” to notify them of the agency’s intent to begin the revocation process.

The Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 permits OSHA to grant approval to states that want to manage their own workplace safety and health program. One stipulation for approval, however, is that the states’ safety standards are “at least as effective” as federal standards. State standards can be stricter than federal OSHA’s standards but not weaker.

Should Arizona’s State Plan status be revoked, the state would go back to an “initial approval” status, and federal OSHA would share enforcement duties with the state, or “concurrent enforcement.”

Former OSHA Deputy Assistant Secretary Jordan Barab noted on his website, Confined Space, that Arizona’s public employees would lose OSHA coverage if federal OSHA takes over the State Plan.

This may not come to fruition, however, because the Industrial Commission of Arizona has moved forward with an ETS for health care workers, an ICA official told Safety+Health. The state has filed a “rulemaking packet” with its attorney general’s office. That’s one of the final steps in the state’s emergency rulemaking, according to the Arizona Rulemaking Manual. Read More»


McCraren Compliance offers many opportunities in safety training to help circumvent accidents. Please take a moment to visit our calendar of classes to see what we can do to help your safety measures from training to consulting.

OSHA extends comment period for rulemaking to protect workers from heat hazards

First published by OSHA

Photo: OSHA

WASHINGTON – The U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration is extending the period for submitting comments on the Advance Notice of Proposed Rulemaking for Heat Injury and Illness Prevention in Outdoor and Indoor Work Settings. Comments on the ANPRM must now be submitted by Jan. 26, 2022.

The 30-day extension provides stakeholders more time to review the ANPRM and collect information and data necessary for comment.

Currently, OSHA does not have a heat-specific standard to protect millions of workers in indoor and outdoor work settings from exposure to hazardous heat conditions. In recent months, OSHA has initiated several efforts to protect workers from heat-related illnesses and deaths while working in hazardously hot indoor and outdoor environments. In addition to pursuing a heat-specific workplace rule, OSHA instituted a heat-related enforcement initiative and plans to issue a National Emphasis Program for heat-related safety efforts in 2022.

The agency began the process of considering a heat-specific workplace rule to address heat-related illnesses when it published the ANPRM on Oct. 27, 2021.

Submit comments, identified by Docket No. OSHA-2021-0009, electronically at www.regulations.gov, which is the Federal e-Rulemaking Portal. The Federal e-Rulemaking Portal is the only way to submit comments on this ANPRM.


McCraren Compliance assists employers in protecting their workers, starting with a comprehensive Work-site Analysis, Hazard Prevention, Controls, and Safety & Health Training.

Please contact us today at 888-758-4757 to learn how we can provide mine safety training and consulting for your business.

OSHA extends comment period for COVID-19 ETS

First published by Safety+Health an NSC publication

Washington — OSHA has extended until Jan. 19 the comment period on its emergency temporary standard on COVID-19 vaccination, testing and masking.

According to a Nov. 30 press release, the extension allows stakeholders additional time to review the ETS as well as collect information and data necessary for comment. OSHA published the ETS in the Nov. 5 Federal Register, with the initial comment period slated to end Dec. 6.

The fate of the ETS is still unclear. The 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals halted the implementation and enforcement of the rule by granting a stay Nov. 12. The 6th Circuit Court of Appeals is slated to consider a consolidated challenge to the ETS in the near future.


McCraren Compliance offers many opportunities in safety training to help circumvent accidents. Please take a moment to visit our calendar of classes to see what we can do to help your safety measures from training to consulting.