Interim Compliance Guidance For Crane Operators

 The U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has issued guidance on how to comply with crane operator certification requirements until the new final rule becomes effective. OSHA proposed a rule in May 2018 to revise certification requirements, as recommended by construction stakeholders. OSHA is preparing to publish a final rule, but OSHA’s existing certification requirements will take effect on Nov. 10 because OSHA’s final rule will not become effective prior to that date. The existing rule requires certification by crane type and lifting capacity. However, until the effective date of the new rule, once it is published, OSHA will accept operator certifications issued by type only, or by type and capacity.

Under the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, employers are responsible for providing safe and healthful workplaces for their employees. OSHA’s role is to help ensure these conditions for America’s working men and women by setting and enforcing standards, and providing training, education and assistance. For more information, visit www.osha.gov.

OSHA Launches Program to Target High Injury and Illness Rates

OSHA is initiating the Site-Specific Targeting Program to target workplaces with high injury rates for inspection. Using injury and illness information electronically submitted by employers for calendar year 2016, OSHA will inspect establishments that should have provided 300A data, but did not. This program helps OSHA ensure that employers provide safe and healthful workplaces by directing enforcement resources to those workplaces with the highest rates of injuries and illnesses. For details on the program, and recordkeeping and reporting requirements, read the news release.

OSHA Issues Memorandum Clarifying Position on Incentive Program Drug Testing

OSHA recently released a memorandum to its regional administrators to clear up confusion about its 2016 recordkeeping rule changes concerning employer safety incentive programs and post-incident drug testing. The bottom line is that employers are still permitted to implement safety incentive programs and require post-incident drug testing, provided that the actions are taken to promote workplace safety and health and not to penalize employees for reporting work-related injuries or illnesses. The memorandum suggests that consistently enforcing legitimate work rules, whether or not an injury or illness is reported, would be one way for employers to show that their companies are promoting workplace safety and health. The memorandum also states that drug testing to evaluate the root causes of workplace incidents is permissible, but affected employers should drug test every employee whose conduct could have contributed to the incident. LEARN MORE

U.S. Department of Labor Provides Compliance Assistance Resources to Keep Workers Safe from Trenching-Related Hazards

WASHINGTON – The U.S. Department of Labor’s OSHA has developed a series of compliance assistance resources to help keep workers safe from trenching and excavation hazards. OSHA’s goal is to increase awareness of trenching hazards in construction, educate job creators and workers on safe cave-in prevention solutions, and decrease the number of trench collapses. These resources, which continue the goals of the Department’s recently announced Office of Compliance Initiatives (OCI), encourage and facilitate compliance evaluations. Read more»

New Public Service Announcement on Trench Safety Available

OSHA released a new public service announcement on trench safety that features U.S. Secretary of Labor Alexander Acosta. The 45-second video, “5 Things You Should Know to Stay Safe,” highlights well-known and proven safety measures that can eliminate hazards and prevent worker injuries. For more information on protecting workers in trenches, see OSHA’s Trenching and Excavation webpage.

 

General Industry and Maritime Silica Standard Effective June 23

 

General industry and maritime employers must comply with OSHA’s silica standard by June 23, except for phase-in dates for General Industry and Maritime Silica Standard Effective June 23medical surveillance and for engineering controls in the oil and gas industry. Visit the silica webpage for guidance on complying with the standard, as well as information on silica sampling and analysis, health effects of silica exposure, and answers to frequently asked questions.

June 12 is National Forklift Safety Day

National Forklift Safety Day - Industrial Truck Association

National Forklift Safety Day, sponsored by the Industrial Truck Association (ITA), will be recognized on June 12 in Washington, D.C., and workplaces nationwide. Throughout the day, forklift manufacturers will highlight the safe use of forklifts, the importance of operator training, and the need for daily equipment checks. ITA works with OSHA through an Alliance to provide training seminars for OSHA inspectors, and develop safety materials. For these and other resources to share on National Forklift Safety Day, visit OSHA’s forklift webpage.

National Safety Stand-Down To Prevent Falls in Construction MAY 7-11, 2018

Fatalities caused by falls from elevation continue to be a leading cause of death for construction employees, accounting for 370 of the 991 construction fatalities recorded in 2016 (BLS data). Those deaths were preventable. The National Safety Stand-Down raises fall hazard awareness across the country in an effort to stop fall fatalities and injuries. Read more»