OSHA investigation of construction worker’s fatal injuries finds Stoughton contractor failed to follow required safety procedures

LMA Services Company LLC faces $142K in penalties

BRAINTREE, MA – A federal investigation has found that a Stoughton general contractor could have prevented an employee from suffering fatal injuries in June 2023 if the employer had followed required safety regulations and trained workers on the safe operation of heavy equipment at a Brockton work site.

The U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration found LMA Services Company LLC exposed employees to struck-by and caught between hazards as they worked near a compact track loader doing excavation work for a new building at Brockton Hospital.

OSHA investigators discovered the track loader’s bucket was elevated and being used to load and unload crushed stone on uneven ground as an employee worked beneath. During the operation, the employee suffered fatal injuries after being struck by the loader and pinned between the ground and the bucket. Further, after OSHA served subpoenas for documents and for managers to testify, the employer delayed providing injury and illness records, which employers are required to provide within four hours of OSHA’s request.

OSHA issued LMA Services Company a willful citation for failing to adequately protect its employees. The citation noted that the employer could have protected its employees by training them to follow the manufacturer’s safety warnings, being aware of hazards in the work area and establishing a site-specific safety plan. OSHA also issued the company a second other-than-serious citation for its failure to provide the requested OSHA logs within the required time period. The agency assessed $142,642 in proposed penalties.

View the willful and other than serious citations.

“LMA Services Company’s safety failures led to the loss of a worker’s life, a tragedy that could have been prevented if proper procedures were followed,” said OSHA Area Director James Mulligan in Braintree, Massachusetts. “Federal law requires employers to identify hazards that can cause harm and make corrections to ensure workers’ safety and health.”

The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reports 484 fatalities caused by being struck by an object or equipment in the workplace in 2022. Approximately 75 percent of struck-by fatalities involve heavy equipment such as trucks or cranes.

Learn more about workplace safety and health.

Based in Stoughton, LMA Services Company LLC is a general contractor specializing in earthwork.

LMA Services Company has contested its citations and penalties to the independent Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission.


McCraren Compliance offers many opportunities in safety training to help circumvent accidents. Please take a moment to visit our calendar of classes to see what we can do to help your safety measures from training to consulting.

Original article published by OSHA

OSHA announces ‘Beat the Heat’ contest winners

Photo: OSHA

WASHINGTON – The U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration announced the winners of its “Beat the Heat” contest. The national competition challenged stakeholders to share their best tools and resources for educating workers about the dangers of heat exposure in indoor and outdoor workplaces.

OSHA received 195 submissions from competitors in 40 states, the District of Columbia and Guam. A panel of experts judged submissions against criteria such as innovation, creativity, strength of message, best non-English language entry and indoor heat emphasis.

To view the winning entries, go to OSHA’s contest webpage. Information on protecting workers from heat illness and injury is available at osha.gov/heat.


McCraren Compliance offers a full range of safety and health training and consulting services. Plus we can help you incorporate well-being into your traditional systems in order to support the Total Worker Health of your workforce.

Call 888-758-4757, email info@mccrarencompliance.com or visit our website www.mccrarencompliance.com

Original article published by OSHA

Heat illness prevention: New resources from OSHA

Washington — A new OSHA fact sheet and sticker are intended to raise awareness of heat illness prevention strategies in the workplace.

Heat illness prevention
Photos: OSHA

The illustrated fact sheet encourages employers to provide training on heat-related illnesses to all employees and put in place an emergency plan. It includes tips for both indoor and outdoor workers. It also features six actions to take when a worker experiences symptoms of a heat-related illness, along with what to do if a worker exhibits signs of a medical emergency, such as slurred speech, seizures, abnormal thinking/behavior or loss of consciousness.

The “Don’t Wait … HYDRATE” sticker – available in English and Spanish – can be given to workers, placed around a workplace or jobsite, and displayed in break areas. The sticker features the URL for OSHA’s Heat Illness Prevention website, where employers and workers can find additional tips, resources and publications.

The “Don’t Wait … HYDRATE” sticker – available in English and Spanish – can be given to workers, placed around a workplace or jobsite, and displayed in break areas. The sticker features the URL for OSHA’s Heat Illness Prevention website, where employers and workers can find additional tips, resources and publications.

McCraren Compliance offers a full range of safety and health training and consulting services. Plus we can help you incorporate well-being into your traditional systems in order to support the Total Worker Health of your workforce.

Call 888-758-4757, email info@mccrarencompliance.com or visit our website www.mccrarencompliance.com

Original article published by Safety+Health an NSC publication

US Department of Labor, trade groups, unions partnering to protect workers from hazards in trenching, excavation

Original article published by OSHA

WASHINGTON – The U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration today signed an agreement with an alliance of trade organizations, labor unions and industry stakeholders to better protect people who do trenching and excavation work.

The two-year agreement between OSHA and the Partners for Safe Trenching and Excavation Operations Alliance will unite the North American Excavation Shoring Association, the Association of Equipment Manufacturers, the National Utility Contractors Association, the Associated General Contractors, the Common Ground Alliance, the International Union of Operating Engineers and the Laborers’ International Union of North America to address some of the construction industry’s most hazardous work.

“Sadly in 2022, we saw a dramatic and disturbing increase in the number of workers who died in trench collapses,” said Assistant Secretary for Occupational Safety and Health Doug Parker. “We know that awareness and vigilance saves lives. Joining with the Partners for Safe Trenching and Excavation Operations Alliance is an important collaboration to help ensure that industry employers are taking the precautions required to keep every worker who enters or works near a trench safe.”

The alliance will help small- and medium-sized employers protect workers from hazards related to trenching, excavation and shoring. The initiative will also focus on the four leading construction industry hazards, namely falls, caught-in or caught-between, struck-by objects and electrocution. In addition, alliance participants will share information on how to improve controls and equipment to reduce worker exposures to hazardous levels of noise and silica.

OSHA will partner with the alliance and its members to develop guidance in multiple languages and deploy resources, such as safety articles and alerts, worksite tours, educational sessions and focused discussions on common hazards in trenching and excavation work and agency priorities and initiatives. Alliance partners will also create and offer podcasts and webinars focused on best practices in trenching and excavation. In addition, the alliance will encourage industry stakeholders to incorporate equity and worker voice into its outreach and activities to help connect as many workers as possible with important worker safety and health information.

Through its Alliance Program, OSHA works with organizations such as trade and professional associations, labor unions, educational institutions, community and faith-based groups, and government agencies to share information about OSHA’s initiatives and compliance assistance resources with workers and employers, and educate workers and employers about their rights and responsibilities.


McCraren Compliance offers many opportunities in safety training to help circumvent accidents. Please take a moment to visit our calendar of classes to see what we can do to help your safety measures from training to consulting.

Fire Fatalities

Original article published by OSHA

OSHA cites entertainment company in Orlando fireworks warehouse blaze, explosion in which 4 workers perished

Finds Magic in the Sky Florida LLC did not follow required safety procedures

ORLANDO, FL – A Florida-based entertainment company could have prevented a deadly fire and explosion at an Orlando warehouse in December 2022 in which four employees perished and a fifth was left hospitalized for months with near-fatal injuries, a federal workplace safety investigation has found.

Investigators with the U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration determined that, as a team of workers employed by Magic in the Sky Florida LLC readied fireworks for a local show, an ignition sparked a fire and explosions in the storage facility. The five employees, who ranged in age from 22 to 27 years old, quickly found themselves trapped.

Following its investigation, OSHA found the company failed to protect its employees by following established safety protocols and issued citations for 10 serious violations. Specifically, the agency determined Magic in the Sky failed to do the following:

  • Ensure proper storage of explosive materials used in commercial fireworks displays.
  • Comply with OSHA’s process safety management standard for preventing or minimizing the unplanned ignition of explosive materials, by performing a hazard analysis, and developing and implementing written process safety procedures and an emergency action plan.
  • Ensure electrical equipment in the work area was designed and classified for use in hazardous locations and could not serve as an ignition source.
  • Develop a hazard communication program and maintain safety data sheets.

The company faces $109,375 in proposed OSHA penalties, an amount set by federal law.

“The deaths of four young workers and a fifth worker’s life-changing injuries exposed Magic in the Sky’s systemic failures that likely led to a fire and explosion the company could have prevented, which only adds to the tragedy,” said OSHA Acting Area Office Director Audrey Windham in Orlando, Florida. “Companies that use pyrotechnics must ensure safety protocols are strictly followed to protect workers from catastrophic consequences.”

Located in St. Petersburg, Florida, Magic in the Sky Florida, LLC is an entertainment services company that specializes in pyrotechnics for use in aerial fireworks displays.

The company has 15 business days from receipt of their citations and penalties to comply, request an informal conference with OSHA, or contest the findings before the independent Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission.


McCraren Compliance offers many opportunities in safety training to help circumvent accidents. Please take a moment to visit our calendar of classes to see what we can do to help your safety measures from training to consulting.

USDOL impact inspections at 20 mines in 15 states find 335 violations in April 2023, miners exposed to 92 serious hazards

Original article published by MSHA

Identified 914 violations, including 257 significant, substantial violations since Jan. 1, 2023

WASHINGTON – The U.S. Department of Labor announced today that its Mine Safety and Health Administration completed impact inspections at 20 mines in 15 states in April 2023 and found 335 violations.

Since Jan. 1, 2023, MSHA’s inspections identified 914 violations, including 257 significant and substantial and 18 unwarrantable failure findings. An S&S violation is one reasonably likely to cause a reasonably serious injury or illness. Violations designated as unwarrantable failures occur when an inspector finds aggravated conduct that constitutes more than ordinary negligence.

The agency opens impact inspections at mines that merit increased agency attention and enforcement due to poor compliance history; previous accidents, injuries, and illnesses; and other compliance concerns. MSHA began using impact inspections after an April 2010 explosion in West Virginia at the Upper Big Branch Mine killed 29 miners.

Among the 355 violations MSHA found in April’s impact inspections were 92 significant and substantial and 5 unwarrantable failure findings. The agency completed these inspections at mines in Arkansas, Arizona, Indiana, Kentucky, Minnesota, Missouri, Montana, Nevada, Ohio, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Utah, West Virginia, and Wyoming.

“Impact inspections highlight the need for mine operators to be vigilant at all times and act quickly to prevent accidents and repeat violations,” said Assistant Secretary for Mine Safety and Health Chris Williamson. “MSHA uses impact inspections to protect the nation’s miners from exposure to the serious safety and health hazards that exist in mine operations.”

The findings in one of April’s impact inspections shows the importance of these targeted inspections in holding mine operators responsible for miners’ safety and health. MSHA opened an inspection in Ohio’s Sandusky County at the Martin Marietta Magnesia Special mine, a large surface lime plant and quarry near Woodville given the following concerns:

  • Three recent hazard complaints and a 2022 nonfatal days lost accident rate almost three times higher than the national average for this type of mine.
  • A serious accident on April 11, 2023, when a miner suffered injuries after a metal guard fell on them. Investigators determined the mine failed to maintain the guard properly. To date, the miner has not returned to work.
  • An increased number of citations and orders.
  • A high rate of significant and substantial citations and orders.

MSHA issued 26 citations following its impact inspection in Woodville. These included 14 significant and substantial violations with an S&S rate of about 54 percent. Inspectors also found violations in two areas of great concern: Martin Marietta did not barricade a hazardous area that exposed workers to serious and potentially fatal injury, similar to the April 11 injury, and failed to construct and maintain guarding that exposed workers to serious injuries. MSHA cited a lack of proper guarding as a factor in its April 11 injury investigation.


McCraren Compliance offers many opportunities in safety training to help circumvent accidents. Please take a moment to visit our calendar of classes to see what we can do to help your safety measures from training to consulting.

NACOSH to provide update on heat injury and illness rulemaking

Original article published by Safety+Health
workers-heat.jpg

Photo: Arizona Department of Transportation

Washington — The National Advisory Committee on Occupational Safety and Health’s work group on heat injury and illness prevention is set to meet virtually in April.

Slated for 2 p.m. Eastern on April 27, the meeting is expected to cover proposed recommendations on potential elements of OSHA’s heat injury and illness prevention rulemaking, as well as the work group’s presentation at an upcoming NACOSH meeting.

The meeting is open to the public, but “participation will be in listen-only mode.” OSHA isn’t accepting comments or requests to speak. Anyone interested in attending must register via the NACOSH webpage.

The 12-member committee advises, consults with, and makes recommendations to the secretaries of labor and health and human services on matters relating to workplace safety and health.


McCraren Compliance offers many opportunities in safety training to help circumvent accidents. Please take a moment to visit our calendar of classes to see what we can do to help your safety measures from training to consulting.

OSHA – Preventable Fatalities

Original article published by OSHA

US Department of Labor finds safety, training failures during investigationof June 2022 double fatality at Pueblo industrial loading facility

Two workers fatally buried when coal pile shifts at Savage Services Corp. location

PUEBLO, CO – A federal workplace safety investigation into the deaths of two workers buried under a pile of shifting coal at a Pueblo industrial loading facility in June 2022 found that their employer failed to follow required federal standards and did not train workers on safety processes.

An investigation by the U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration learned that, as three employees of Savage Services Corp. climbed onto the coal pile to determine if the feeder below was receiving coal, the pile shifted. The falling coal fatally buried two workers and the third employee was able to escape without injury.

OSHA issued citations to Savage Services Corp. – a global provider of industry infrastructure and supply chain services – for one serious violation and two willful violations for failing to implement safe work practices and for not training workers as required. The company faces $304,556 in proposed penalties.

In a similar incident in December 2020, a coal pile collapsed onto a bulldozer at a company facility in New Mexico, trapping an employee inside the machine until their rescue an hour later.

“A near-tragedy at another Savage Services Corp. facility in 2020 made the company acutely aware of the serious hazards for those working around coal piles and yet, two workers’ families, friends and co-workers are now left to grieve,” said OSHA Area Director Chad Vivian in Englewood, Colorado. “With legally required standard safety practices in place and training provided, the company could have prevented this terrible incident.”

Based in Midvale, Utah, Savage Services Corp. has more than 200 locations throughout the U.S., as well as in Canada, Mexico and Saudi Arabia.

The corporation has 15 business days from receipt of its citations and penalties to comply, request an informal conference with OSHA’s area director, or contest the findings before the independent Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission.


McCraren Compliance offers many opportunities in safety training to help circumvent accidents. Please take a moment to visit our calendar of classes to see what we can do to help your safety measures from training to consulting.

Improving nanomaterial Safety Data Sheets: CPWR launches e-tool

Original article published by Safety+Health
NanoSDS.jpg

Photo: CPWR – The Center for Construction Research and Training

Silver Spring, MD — A new e-tool from CPWR – The Center for Construction Research and Training is intended to help manufacturers, distributors and importers of products that contain nanomaterials strengthen their Safety Data Sheets.

The free, interactive Nano Safety Data Sheet Improvement Tool poses to users a series of questions to help evaluate their existing SDSs, and then generates a report with recommendations for improvement. That report is based on the 16 sections of an SDS required by OSHA that follow specifications of the Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labeling of Chemicals.

Nanomaterials – materials that have at least one dimension (height, width or length) that’s smaller than 100 nanometers – are chemical substances whose microscopic size gives them properties they don’t possess in their larger form.

CPWR has identified more than 800 nanomaterials that are increasingly being used in construction. Those materials include sealants, coatings, paints, concrete, flooring, lubricants and roofing materials. When workers use the materials, they can be exposed to fumes, gases, vapors and dust containing nanomaterials, which can present health hazards.

Knowing which materials could be hazardous allows workers to take precautions to mitigate the risks, according to CPWR, which says SDSs for these products should clearly identify nanomaterials that are present and offer information on potential safety and health risks.

2019 study led by Laura Hodson, the retired coordinator of the NIOSH Nanotechnology Research Center, revealed that only 3% of the nanomaterial SDSs evaluated were satisfactory and 79% needed significant improvement.


McCraren Compliance assists employers in protecting their workers, starting with a comprehensive Work-site Analysis, Hazard Prevention, Controls, and Safety & Health Training.

Please contact us today at 888-758-4757 to learn how we can provide mine safety training and consulting for your business.

Profits Before People

Original article published by OSHA

Profit Over People: Alarming trend continues at Dollar General storeswhere seven Southeast inspections again find willful violations

OSHA issues $2.7M in penalties after latest inspections, more than $12.3M since 2017

ATLANTA – Less than one month after the U.S. Department of Labor cited Dollar General Corp. and Dolgencorp LLC with more than $1.6 million in penalties for putting its workers’ safety at risk, federal inspectors have issued citations for similar violations at store locations in Alabama, Florida and Georgia, and added $2,777,640 in proposed penalties now owed by one of the nation’s largest discount retailers.

Since 2017, Dollar General Corp. and Dolgencorp LLC have received more than $12.3 million in initial penalties for numerous willful, repeat and serious workplace safety violations. During the past five years, OSHA found unsafe conditions that expose workers to the possibility of being struck by falling boxes of merchandise or trapped or unable to exit the store safely in an emergency in more than 180 inspections at Dollar General stores nationwide.

Seven inspections by the department’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration from April 28 through June 3, 2022 – in Clay, Dothan, Odenville and Town Creek, Alabama; Darien and West Point, Georgia; and Panama City Beach, Florida – identified 31 violations similar to those found at other Dollar General stores where litigation is pending. Violations issued as the result of the inspections have qualified Dollar General Corp. for inclusion in the Severe Violator Enforcement Program.

“Dollar General has shown a pattern of alarmingly willful disregard for federal safety standards, choosing to place profits over their employees’ safety and well-being,” said Assistant Secretary for Occupational Safety and Health Doug Parker. “Neighborhood stores exist to support the needs of their communities – the same communities in which many Dollar General employees live – and that support must include following laws designed to keep workers safe from preventable injuries or worse.”

Specifically, OSHA inspectors cited Dollar General Corp. and Dolgencorp LLC for 11 willful, 16 repeat and four serious violations at the seven Southeast locations. In addition to the struck-by and blocked exit hazards, OSHA cited the company for:

  • Failing to label, mount, or make fire extinguishers accessible.
  • Storing boxes in front of electrical panels, increasing the risk of fire and electrical hazards.
  • Failing to use exit signs to facilitate safe egress in the event of an emergency.
  • Exposing workers to electrocution by not keeping unused openings in electrical cabinets closed.
  • Not providing handrails on stairs where required.

The violations found in these recent inspections mirror those OSHA has found at Dollar General locations across the nation.

In October 2022, inspections at four locations in Alabama, Florida and Georgia uncovered numerous hazards, leading OSHA to propose $1,682,302 in penalties. In August 2022, after inspections at three other Georgia locations, OSHA proposed $1,292,783 in penalties for exposing workers to fire, electrical, and entrapment hazards by failing to keep exit routes and electrical panels unobstructed. In February 2022, OSHA proposed $1,048,309 in penalties after inspections at three other Mobile locations and one in Dalton, Georgia, found similar hazards.

In December 2021, an inspection in Mobile led OSHA to propose $321,827 in penalties for exposing workers to slip and trip hazards, and not keeping the main storeroom orderly to allow a safe exit in an emergency.

Based in Goodlettsville, Tennessee, Dollar General Corp. and Dolgencorp LLC operates about 18,000 stores and 17 distribution centers in 47 states and employs more than 150,000 workers.

Dollar General has 15 business days from receipt of its citations and penalties to comply, request an informal conference with OSHA’s area director, or contest the findings before the independent Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission.

Under the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, employers are responsible for providing safe and healthful workplaces for their employees. OSHA’s role is to ensure these conditions for America’s workers by setting and enforcing standards, and providing training, education and assistance.


McCraren Compliance offers many opportunities in safety training to help circumvent accidents. Please take a moment to visit our calendar of classes to see what we can do to help your safety measures from training to consulting.